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Reference for Paris Opéra:

Nikolaus Pevsner—A History of Building Types, 1976, p.85.

defines a more intimate circle of presence of the altar. The transition from the 'outside' to the 'inside' of the chapel is simple, but it includes various stages: crossing the bridge onto the platform; approaching the chapel; and going in, which must be like entering a shell—entry is progressive rather than immediate, and the modifying element of light, which enters through the door too, washes progressively more dimly on the curving wall.

The Opéra in Paris is a grander example. It was designed by Charles Garnier, and built in ,1875. The section has been simplified to show only the major internal spaces. The heart of the Opéra is of course the auditorium—the tiers of seating, and the stage. The transition is from the everyday world of the city outside to a place where one is in the presence of the magic, or make believe, of opera or ballet.

The first stage in this transition is the flight of steps at the entrance which immediately raises one onto a plane above the mundane. The second is the entrance through the thick walls into the first lobby. From here one can see through to the second lobby where there is the grand staircase. This space is richly ornamented and brightly lit. It is like a stage itself, on which the audience can display themselves before going into the auditorium for the performance. The proscenium arch is the ultimate transition.

In the Paris Opéra there is a sequence of transitions from the street to the make-believe world of the stage.

In the Paris Opéra there is a sequence of transitions from the street to the make-believe world of the stage.

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