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Fig. 6.70. The alleged date 1506 on an engraving by the German artist Altdorfer. The first "figure of one" is separated with a dot and visibly written as the Roman letter I, or the first letter of the name Jesus (Iesus). The alleged figure of 5 is written as a figure of 7. Could the year have been 1706 and not 1506? Could Altdorfer have lived later than the XVI century? Taken from [1203], No. 2.

Fig. 6.71. Our drawn copy of the date from Altdorfer's engraving ([1203], No. 2).

Fig. 6.72. The alleged date 1524 written as". i. 524." on an engraving by Albrecht Durer - that is, the first letter is clearly seen as the Roman dotted "i", or the first letter of the name Jesus (Iesus). Taken from [714], page 22.

Fig. 6.73. Fragment of the inscription from Diirer's engraving ([714], page 22). The drawn parts are ours.

TJ 'Ärioii %l>nfll1! iWianiyrä't «V fj,V i'i ■JS^Jnf.W^;«

Fig. 6.76. An ancient miniature portraying "Pope Gregory VII Hildebrand", which translates as "ablaze with gold". Taken from [492], Volume 1, page 59.

Fig. 6.74. An engraving by Georg Pencz, a XVI century painter. The alleged date 1548 on this engraving is written as J548, with the first letter of the name Jesus used in lieu of the first "digit". Taken from [714], page 30.

Fig. 6.73a. An old engraving portraying Berthold Schwarz, the inventor of gunpowder. The date on the engraving is written with the Roman letter "i" instead of the figure of 1 used today. Taken from [ 1121:1 ], an inset following the title page of the book.

Fig. 6.73b. A close-in of the date from the engraving portraying Berthold Schwarz. We can clearly see the Roman "i" instead of 1. Taken from [1121:1], an inset following the title page of the book.

Fig. 6.74. An engraving by Georg Pencz, a XVI century painter. The alleged date 1548 on this engraving is written as J548, with the first letter of the name Jesus used in lieu of the first "digit". Taken from [714], page 30.

Fig. 6.75. Fragment with the date from the engraving by Pencz ([714], page 30). The drawn parts are ours.

Fig. 6.76. An ancient miniature portraying "Pope Gregory VII Hildebrand", which translates as "ablaze with gold". Taken from [492], Volume 1, page 59.

Fig. 6.78. Another very late and thus apparently quite arbitrary portrait of Pope "Gregory VII", or "Hildebrand". From a XVIII century Latin book titled The Portraits of the Holy Pontiffs. Taken from (578], Volume 1, page 356, ill. 13.

Fig. 6.77. A rather late and most probably arbitrary picture of Pope "Gregory VII" or "Hildebrand". Taken from [544], Volume 5, page 633, ill. 110.

Fig. 6.78. Another very late and thus apparently quite arbitrary portrait of Pope "Gregory VII", or "Hildebrand". From a XVIII century Latin book titled The Portraits of the Holy Pontiffs. Taken from (578], Volume 1, page 356, ill. 13.

"Hildebrand" (Ablaze With Gold?) is considered to have been born in 1020 a.d. and been Pope from 1073 till 1085 ([ 196]). His portraits, most probably of a later origin, are shown in fig. 6.77 and fig. 6.78. The Nativity of Christ apparently took place in the middle of the XI century, but certain documents could have erroneously shifted this event backwards and assigned it to the beginning of the XI century. This could have resulted in a further shift - by roughly 1050 or 1000 years - of certain documents using the detailed way of recording dates, "since the Nativity of Christ the III century", instead of the abbreviation "X.III century". In other words, the shift by 1050 or 1000 years might have been the difference between the detailed and abbreviated method of recording dates. The chronological shift generated by this mistake must have constituted about 1000 years. This error is clearly visible in the Scaligerian chronology! What we see is one of its main shifts, q.v. on the global chronological map above.

We shall reiterate: for example, "the III century since Christ", or the III century from the middle of the XI century a.d., could have been recorded both as "III century" and "X.III century". This could have led to confusion and a chronological shift by approximately 1000 years.

13.3. Until the XVIII century, the Latin letters "I" or "J" - i.e. the first letters of the name of Jesus - were still used in several European regions to denote "one" in recording of dates

We have above come up with an idea that old documents used to refer to the name of XPIETOE (Christ) by the first letter X in the recording of dates, which was later declared to stand for the figure of ten. In a similar way, the letter /or/ used to mean the name of Iesus (Iesus), but was later declared to denote one thousand. The result: a millenarian chronological shift, casting many events of the XI-XVII century backwards in time.

We shall now present new data on this. Professor, Academician (IAELPS), Merited Employee of Oil and Gas Industry of Russian Federation, M. H. Musin has recently been so kind as to draw our attention to a very rare book from his own private library - the 1937 edition of Annales de la Société Royale d'Archéologie de Bruxelles ( [ 1012] ) contain-

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Ur Gklstbert *" •ENGF.lpn ing a very interesting work by Chanoine F. Crooy Les orfèvres de Bois-le-Duc et leurs poinçons ([1012], pages 5-41). The book analyses several ancient brass plates with the names of XVI-XVIII century Belgian goldsmiths of Bois-le-Duc etched on them, and presents examples of their sigils. We should stress that brass plates were official records enabling one to check the authenticity of each goldsmith's sigil. Therefore, these plates are of a special interest to us, as they reproduce the style and form of the official documents from the territory of contemporary Belgium of the XVI-XVIII century.

The book [1012] provides photographs of all those brass plates on which goldsmiths' names are arranged in a column, with the year and a specimen sigil of the craftsman next to each name. It is the way the dates were recorded on the plates that is extremely important to us now.

Names of the first 33 Belgian craftsmen are listed without indication of any dates at all. The first date appears in the bottom right corner of the plate in fig. 6.79. Historians tell us it is the year 1642 a.d. recorded here, q.v. in fig. 6.80. However, we see absolutely clearly the Latin letter "J" - that is, the first letter of the name of Jesus - in place of the figure of "one". Thus, this date most probably stands for "year 642 since Jesus ". But in this case, counting 642 years back from 1642, we arrive at circa 1000 a.d. as the date of the Nativity of Jesus Christ.

On fig. 6.80, fig. 6.81, fig. 6.82, fig. 6.83, fig. 6.84, fig. 6.85, fig. 6.86, fig. 6.87, fig. 6.88, fig. 6.89, fig. 6.90, fig. 6.91, fig. 6.92, fig. 6.93, fig. 6.94 and fig. 6.95, we list all dates in the order they are mentioned on the Belgian plates. Namely,

J642, i607, i607, j607, i.608, i615, i618,1618, i620, j620, j620, j624, i628, j63i, j63j, i635, i635, j637, j637, j64i, j642, J643, J647, J644, J65J, J65J, J65J, j652, J654, J654, j658, j659,1662, J662, j663, j665, j'665, j666, j666, j66, j668, j670, j671, i672, i672, J674, j676, J676. J649, J677, J678, j679,1679, j684, j685, j685, j686, j690, J692, J692, J693, J693 or J695, J696, J697, j703, J706, J706, J708, J708, J709, J709, j7j0, j7jj, J7JJ, J7J2, i7j2, j7i2, j725, j726, j734, i735, i735, i735, j738, i742, then there is a very curious record of a date, jJ99. Most likely, it is 1744, although one is written as j, seven as J, and four as the modern "Arabic" nine. The subsequent dates are, 1745, i752, i(or j)7-53, J754, j757, J758, J758,

Fig. 6.79. A copper plaque with the names and the sigils of the Belgian goldsmiths of the XVI-XVIII century. Taken from [ 1012], the appendices at the end of the book.

Fig. 6.80. The very first date, namely, J642, that we encounter on the consecutive Belgian plaques with the names of the XVI-XVIII century goldsmiths. The "figure of one" is written as the Roman letter J here - the first name of the name Jesus. Taken from [1012], Appendices, PL 1/2.

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ing a very interesting work by Chanoine F. Crooy Les orfèvres de Bois-le-Duc et leurs poinçons ([1012], pages 5-41). The book analyses several ancient brass plates with the names of XVI-XVIII century Belgian goldsmiths of Bois-le-Duc etched on them, and presents examples of their sigils. We should stress that brass plates were official records enabling one to check the authenticity of each goldsmith s sigil. Therefore, these plates are of a special interest to us, as they reproduce the style and form of the official documents from the territory of contemporary Belgium of the XVI-XVIII century.

The book [1012] provides photographs of all those brass plates on which goldsmiths5 names are arranged in a column, with the year and a specimen sigil of the craftsman next to each name. It is the way the dates were recorded on the plates that is extremely important to us now.

Names of the first 33 Belgian craftsmen are listed without indication of any dates at all. The first date appears in the bottom right corner of the plate in fig. 6.79. Historians tell us it is the year 1642 a.d. recorded here, q.v. in fig. 6.80. However, we see absolutely clearly the Latin letter "J" - that is, the first letter of the name of Jesus - in place of the figure of "one". Thus, this date most probably stands for "year 642 since Jesus ". But in this case, counting 642 years back from 1642, we arrive at circa 1000 a.d. as the date of the Nativity of Jesus Christ.

On fig. 6.80, fig. 6.81, fig. 6.82, fig. 6.83, fig. 6.84, fig. 6.85, fig. 6.86, fig. 6.87, fig. 6.88, fig. 6.89, fig. 6.90, fig. 6.91, fig. 6.92, fig. 6.93, fig. 6.94 and fig. 6.95, we list all dates in the order they are mentioned on the Belgian plates. Namely,

J642, i607, i607, j607, i.608, ¡615, i618,1618, i620, j620, j620, j624, i628, j63i, j63j, i635, i635, j637, j637, j64i, j642, J643, J647, J644, J65J, J65J, J65J, j652, J654, J654, j658, j659,1662, J662, j663, j665, j665, j666, j666, j66, j668, J670, j671, i672, i672, J674, j676, J676. J649, J677, J678, j679,1679, j684, j685, j685, j686, j690, J692, J692, J693, J693 or J695, J696, J697, j703, J706, J706, J708, J708, J709, J709, j7j0, j7jj, J7JJ, J7J2, i7j2, j7i2, j725, j726, j734, i735, i735, i735, j738, i742, then there is a very curious record of a date, jJ99. Most likely, it is 1744, although one is written as j, seven as J, and four as the modern "Arabic" nine. The subsequent dates are, 1745, i752, i(or j)7-53, J754J757, J758, J758,

Fig. 6.79. A copper plaque with the names and the sigils of the Belgian goldsmiths of the XVI-XVIII century. Taken from [1012], the appendices at the end of the book.

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