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Fig. 6.31. A triple superposition of the early mediaeval Armenian Catholicoses, the mediaeval Holy Roman Empire of the alleged X-XIII century, and the "ancient" Biblical Judean kings.

1st Byzantine Empire 2nd Byzantine Empire

Fig. 6.32. Reign correlation of the First "early mediaeval" Byzantine Empire and the Second "mediaeval" Byzantine Empire (a rough scheme). The shift comprises about 340 years.

3rd Byzantine Empire 2nd Byzantine Empire

Fig. 6.33. Reign correlation of the Second "mediaeval" Byzantine Empire and the Third mediaeval Byzantine empire (a rough scheme). The shift comprises about 330 years.

First Byzantine Empire (duplicate?)

Fig. 6.34. A triple superposition of the First, the Second and the Third Byzantine Empire on the time axis with rigid shifts of 340 and 330 years (rough scheme).

b.c. described in the Bible, 1-2 Samuel +1-2 Kings and Chronicles. See also pair number 3 in fig. 6.13.

b - the dynastic jet of the mediaeval Holy Roman Empire of allegedly 911-1307 a.d. Here c(a, b) = 1(T12. Every Roman-German Emperor of 911-1307 a.d. is represented with the period of his German reign, i.e., from the moment of coronation by the German crown.

a = the "ancient" kings of Israel of allegedly 922-724 b.c. described in the Bible, 1-2 Samuel +1-2 Kings and Chronicles, fig. 6.13.

b = the dynasty consisting of mediaeval Roman coronations of the alleged German emperors in Italy in allegedly 920-1170 a.d. Here c(a, b) = 10~8. Here we are referring to the "dynasty" composed of intervals between adjacent Roman coronations of the emperors of the following, allegedly German, dynasties: Saxon, Salian or Franconian, the Schwabian House of Hohenstaufens.

The two last pairs signify an identification of an allegedly "very ancient" Biblical history from the Old Testament with the mediaeval history of Europe of the X-XIV century a.d., and partially, with the Eastern European history of the XIV-XVI century. This parallelism that we discovered differs from the identification proposed by N. A. Morozov in [544] by approximately one thousand years, and disagrees with the Scaligerian chronology by two thousand years.

Thus, the periods of German reign are superposed over the dynasty of Judah described in the Bible. The periods, mainly contained between adjacent Roman coronations of the same rulers of 920-1170 a.d., are identified with the dynasty of Israel as described in the Bible.

Running a few steps forward, may the reader be warned about a possible misunderstanding. The rulers of the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation of the X-XIII century, and the Habsburgs of the epoch of the XIV-XVI century, should not be thought to have had their major residence in Germany or Italy. The centre (and the capital) of their empire must have been elsewhere - see Chron5 and Chron6. Let us note that the name itself, Habsburg or Hapsburg, might have initially consisted of two words: Hab+Burg, since Burg means 4 city". The Latin word HAB (or HAP) could appear as a result of reading the word HAB, i.e. NEW, in Latin. Latin H and Slavonic H (N) are written in a similar way, likewise Latin B and Slavonic B (V). Therefore, the name Habsburgs might have initially meant New City (.Hoeuu Fopod, Novy Gorod) or New Citizens (Hoe-Topodufiiy Nov-Gorodtsy). We will hereinafter keep the reader reminded about this possible origin of the name of the Habsburgs.

Let us briefly list other examples of duplicate dynasties. See details in [904], [908] and [909].

Identification of Russian czar-khans of 1276-1600 a.d. with the Habsburg empire of 1273-1600 a.d. on the time axis. No chronological shift here. G. V. No-sovskiy and yours truly discovered this parallelism together; it is described in more detail in Chronz.

Example 12 is shown in fig. 6.31.

Triple identification of the mediaeval Armenian Catholicos "dynasty" with the mediaeval Holy Ro-man-German Empire of the alleged X-XIII century and with the "ancient" kings of Judah described in the Bible. This parallelism is described in more detail in Appendix 6.5 to Chroni.

Example 13 is shown in fig. 6.32.

The mediaeval First Byzantine Empire of allegedly 527-829 a.d. and the mediaeval Second Byzantine Empire of allegedly 829-1204 a.d. See details in [904], [908]. This parallelism is described in more detail later.

Example 14 is shown in fig. 6.33, fig. 6.34, fig. 6.35 and fig. 6.36.

The mediaeval Second Byzantine Empire of allegedly 867-1143 a.d. and the mediaeval Third Byzantine Empire of 1204-1453 a.d. Triple identification of all of these three empires is shown in fig. 6.34, in a brief diagram; a detailed diagram with indication of names is presented in fig. 6.35 and fig. 6.36.

Example 15 is shown in fig. 6.37, fig. 6.38 and fig. 6.39.

The 410 year shift in the mediaeval Russian history was first discovered by empirico-statistical methods described above, in Chroni, ch. 5:2.16. Russian history of 945-1174 a.d. turns out to be largely a phantom reflection, or a duplicate of a later epoch of 1363-1598 a.d. G. V. Nosovskiy and yours truly discovered this important dynastic parallelism together. This identification is discussed in Chron4 in more detail.

Example 16 is shown in fig. 6.40 and fig. 6.41.

Identification of the "ancient" Greek history and the mediaeval Greek history with a 1810 year shift. See details in the following chapters. An enlarged fragment of this parallelism is shown in fig. 6.41. This brightly eventful parallelism identifies the fragment of the history of mediaeval Greece of 1250-1460 a.d. with the fragment of the history of the "ancient" Greece of allegedly 510-300 b.c.

Example 17 is shown in fig. 6.42, fig. 6.43, fig. 6.44, fig. 6.45, fig. 6.46, and also in fig. 6.47 and 6.48.

Identification of the mediaeval history of England of 640-1330 a.d. with the mediaeval history of Byzantium of 380-1453 a.d. with a rigid shift of 210-270 years forwards and of 100-120 years backwards. In this case, the duplicates are three Byzantine dynasties: Byzantium-1, Byzantium-2 and Byzantium-3, fig. 6.42. See Chron4 for details. The list of mutually identified English and Byzantine rulers is shown in fig. 6.43. For the chronological identification of these rulers with each other, see fig. 6.44, fig. 6.45, fig. 6.46, fig. 6.47 and 6.48.

Example 18 is shown in fig. 6.49 and fig. 6.50.

Two more dynastic parallelisms between fragments of the "ancient" Greek history and that of mediaeval Greece and Byzantium.

Example 19 is shown in fig. 6.51 and fig. 6.52.

In the early mediaeval Roman Empire of allegedly 300-552 a.d. there is a dynastic jet parallel to "the Regal Rome" of Titus Livy, an "ancient" regal dynasty of seven kings. Here c(ay b) = 10"\ This is the smallest possible value for a dynasty of seven kings.

Example 20 is shown in fig. 6.52a.

Justinian I + Theodora (38! (527-565). Start of Eastern Roman Empire. Nika riot.

Heraclius (610-641) Then (left and right) two strifes'

Constantine III (641), Heracleonas = Heraclius II (641). (1) Overlapping of strifes

Constans II (642-668), Constantine IV (668-685), Justinian II (685-695) <(53)

Strife: Leontius II (695-698) or Leoncius (694-697), Tiberius^ III (697-704) (698-705), Justinian II (705-711) (secondly), Philippicus Bardanes (711-713), Anastasius II (713-715 or 716), Theodosius (715 or 716-717)

War under Justinian Leo III the Isaurian (717-741)*(24)

Constantine V Copronymus (741-775)

Leo IV (775-780), Constantine VI (780-797), Irene (797-802), Nicephorus (802-811)

Strife: Stauracius (811), Michael I Rangabe (811-813), Leo V (813-820 or 821), Michael II (820 or 821-829)

Justinian I + Theodora (38! (527-565). Start of Eastern Roman Empire. Nika riot.

(38) Theophilus (829-842) + Michael I and Theodora (842-867). Start of Macedonian dynasty

(38) Theophilus (829-842) + Michael I and Theodora (842-867). Start of Macedonian dynasty

Alexander (912-913)

Romanus I (919-945)

Constantine VII (910 or 912-959)

Romanus II (959-963),Nicephorus II ^ 17) Phocas (963-969), John I Tsimisces (963-976) 2nd version:

Nicephorus II Phocas +Jk[]3) ( . John I Tsimisces Constantine Xji (53) (963-976) (or VIII) /

Strife: Constantine VIII (1025-1028), Romanus III (1028-1034), Michael IV (1034-1041), Michael V (1041-1042), Constantine IX ▲ Monomachus (1042-1054), Theodora (1054-1056), Michael VI (1056-1057)

Alexius I Comneus (1081-1118)

John II Comneus (25) (1118-1143)

Manuel I Comneus (1143-1180)

Strife: Alexius II Comneus (1180-1183), Andronicus I (1183-1185), Issac II Angelus (1185-1195), Alexius III (1195-1203), Alexius IV (1203-1204), Isaac II Angelus (1203-1204, secondly), Alexius V (1204). Fall of Constantinople in 1204.

Alexander (912-913)

Romanus I (919-945)

Theodore I Lascaris (1204-1222)

Manuel II

(1391-1424 or 1425)

1204: start of Nicaean Empire (cf. Nika riot)

Theodore I Lascaris (1204-1222)

John III Ducas Vatatzes (1222-1254 or 1256), GTR war

(3) Theodore II Lascaris (1254 or 1256-1258 or 1259)

Michael VIII

(1259 or 1260-1282 or 1283)

Andronicus II Paleologus (1282 or 1283-1320 or 1328)

Andronicus III Paleologus (1320-1341) or 2nd version: Andronicus III Paleologus (1328-1341)

John V Paleologus (1341-1391 or 1376)

Strife (1376-1391). Andronicus IV (1376-1379), John V (1379-1391, secondly), John VII (1390)

Manuel II

(1391-1424 or 1425)

Fall of Constantinople in 1453. End of Byzantine Empire.

On the left: a superposition of the First Bizantine Empire (527-829 ad.) upon the Second Bizantine Empire (829-1204 ad.) by durations of reign with a rigid 340 year shift. On the right: a superposition of the 867-1143 ad. dynasty jet from the Second Byzantine Empire upon the Third Byzantine Empire (1204-1453 ad.) by durations of reign with a rigid 330 year shift. Datings of reign are taken from [76], [195].

Fig. 6.35. Triple reign correlation of the First, the Second and the Third Byzantine Empire with shifts of 340 and 330 years. Detailed scheme giving names.

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