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Fig. 17.2 Interior Walkway Washington University ARCHITECT: The Eggers Group. P.C., Architects and Planners renderer: Octavio Figueroa medium: Pencil

Fig. 17.3 Proposed Residence ARCHITECT AND RENDERER: Robert Zaccone. A.I. A.

medium: Colored pencil on tracing paper

Fig. 17.3 Proposed Residence ARCHITECT AND RENDERER: Robert Zaccone. A.I. A.

medium: Colored pencil on tracing paper

Architectural Rendering Tracing Paper Rendering Architecture Ink Effect Pen Rendering Buildings

Fig. 17.4 Proposed Office Building ARCHITECT: Berkus-Group Architects RENDERER: David Haskin MEDIUM: Pen and ink

Barry Berkus Design

Fig. 17.5 Sixth Street Festival Marketplace

ARCHITECT: Marcellus Wright Cox & Smith, Architects renderer: Howard Associates. Inc. medium: Ink and color on vellum

Fig. 17.5 Sixth Street Festival Marketplace

ARCHITECT: Marcellus Wright Cox & Smith, Architects renderer: Howard Associates. Inc. medium: Ink and color on vellum

Pen And Ink Architecture
Fig. 17.6 AT&T Headquarters architect: Johnson/Burgee. Architects renderer: Mark de Nalovy Rozvadovski medium: Pen and ink

A Gallery of Professional Renderings / 213

Rendering Architecture Ink Effect

Fig. 1.31 Design for Dunrobbin Castle. (Draftsman: Sir Charles Barry.)

Delineation in the United States

Ii is understandable that the European tradition has had a strong effect upon delineation in the United States. The numerous European architects who migrated to America brought with them the methods and techniques they had earned and practiced in their homelands. The architects who practiced in the Inited States were either educated in Europe or trained in the United States .inder the European pupilage system. Group architectural training was first liven in American schools of technology, and as early as I860 was laugh I as part >t the science of building. However, the Society of Beaux Arts Architects, formed .11 New York in 1894, helped to encourage a less mathematical approach to rendering. Gradually, as the American schools of architecture matured, they took the burden of education upon themselves. Today great numbers of students from various countries of the world come to the United States to study architecture.

Fig. 1.31 Design for Dunrobbin Castle. (Draftsman: Sir Charles Barry.)

Rendering Today

\s previously illustrated, the importance of delineation at the Ecoledes Beaux \its was almost an entity within itself, and design was a separate but equal ntity. On the other hand, the Bauhaus used delineation as a tool to the more mportant aspect of the design concept.

Not only are the traditional materials, such as watercolor or pen and ink, used n present-day rendering, but new materials and media are constantly being invented, and the traditional media are constantly being improved. New kinds A pencils, inks, and papers are being offered, and they are relatively available and relatively inexpensive. Looking back, it may be seen that the forces that j flee ted the development of architectural rendering have been interwoven with

Fig. 17.7 AT&T Headquarters architect: Johnson/Burgee, Architects renderer: Mark de Nalovy Rozvadovski MEDIUM: Pen and ink

Fig 17.8 AT&T Headquarters architect: Johnson/Burgee, Architects renderer: Mark de Nolovy Rozvadovski medium: Pen and ink

Fig. 17.7 AT&T Headquarters architect: Johnson/Burgee, Architects renderer: Mark de Nalovy Rozvadovski MEDIUM: Pen and ink

Photocopy Ink MarksPhotocopy Ink Marks
Trw Inc Headquarters
Fig. 17.9 trw New Headquarters architect: FCL Associates renderer: Howard Associates. Inc. medium: Ink on vellum with color added to photocopy

Fig. 17.10 St. Joseph's Church ARCHITECT: Berkus-Group Architects RENDERER: Richard Yaco MEDIUM: Pen and ink on vellum

Fig. 17.10 St. Joseph's Church ARCHITECT: Berkus-Group Architects RENDERER: Richard Yaco MEDIUM: Pen and ink on vellum

Pen And Ink Rendering Techniques

Fig 17.11 Interior of St. Joseph s Church architect: Berkus-Group Architects RENDERER Richard Yaco MEDIUM: Pen and ink on vellum

Fig 17.11 Interior of St. Joseph s Church architect: Berkus-Group Architects RENDERER Richard Yaco MEDIUM: Pen and ink on vellum

Fig. 17.12 Demonstration Rendering COMPLIMENTS: Calcomp Sanders Computer Co.

medium: Pen and ink plotted on Mylar

Architecture Ink Wash

Fig. 17.12 Demonstration Rendering COMPLIMENTS: Calcomp Sanders Computer Co.

medium: Pen and ink plotted on Mylar

Fig. 17.13 Office Building

ARCHITECT: John Graham and Company.

Architects, Planners, Engineers renderer: Dale Jorgensen media: Pen and ink and color wash on diazo sepia print

A Gallery of Professional Renderings / '21V

Pen Wash Building Rendering

Fig. 17.13 Office Building

ARCHITECT: John Graham and Company.

Architects, Planners, Engineers renderer: Dale Jorgensen media: Pen and ink and color wash on diazo sepia print

A Gallery of Professional Renderings / '21V

Fig. 17.14 New Jersey Bell C.D.C. II architect: The Grad Partnership renderer: Licht/Levine media: Computer-generated perspective. rendered with opaque watercolor and designer s gouache

Architectural Renderings Gouache

Fig. 17.14 New Jersey Bell C.D.C. II architect: The Grad Partnership renderer: Licht/Levine media: Computer-generated perspective. rendered with opaque watercolor and designer s gouache

Fig. 17.15 Rochester Riverfront ARCHITECT: Davis Brody RENDERER: Richard Baehr. A.I.A. MEDIUM: Tempera

Architectural Renderings GouacheRichard Baehr Rendering

Fig. 17.16 Trump Plaza ARCHITECT: Phillip Birnbaum & Associates RENDERER: Richard Baehr. A.I.A. MEDIUM: Tempera

*

1 '

Fig Central Renderings

A Gallery of Professional Renderings / 219

Riverfront Plaza Renderings Fig Central Renderings

Fig. 17.17 Pacwest Center architect: The Stubbins Associates. Inc.,

Architects; Skidmore. Owings & Merrill,

Associate Architects owner: Russell Development Company,

Inc.

renderer: Howard Associates. Inc. medium: Casein

Fig. 17.17 Pacwest Center architect: The Stubbins Associates. Inc.,

Architects; Skidmore. Owings & Merrill,

Associate Architects owner: Russell Development Company,

Inc.

renderer: Howard Associates. Inc. medium: Casein

Airbrush For Architecture Student

Fig. 17.18 Student Project renderer: Anthony Szekalski medium: Acrylic on illustration board ft wr^mH

Fig Central Renderings
Fig. 17.19 Student Project RENDERER: Anthony Szekakski MEDIUM: Acrylic on illustration board
Www Architecture Usa

rr A

rr A

Trump Tower Atrium

Fig. 17.20 Interior Atrium Trump Tower

ARCHITECT: Swanke Hayden Connell Ltd. RENDERER: Lewis Iglehart, A.I.A. MEDIUM: Ink and watercolor with airbrush

Fig. 17.20 Interior Atrium Trump Tower

ARCHITECT: Swanke Hayden Connell Ltd. RENDERER: Lewis Iglehart, A.I.A. MEDIUM: Ink and watercolor with airbrush

A Gallery of Professional Renderings / 221

Fig. 17.21 Seaport Plaza architect: Swanke Hayden Connell Ltd. renderer: Lewis Iglehart, A.I.A. medium: Ink and watercolor with airbrush

Airbrush For Architecture Student

Fig. 17.21 Seaport Plaza architect: Swanke Hayden Connell Ltd. renderer: Lewis Iglehart, A.I.A. medium: Ink and watercolor with airbrush

??? / Architectural Rendering

Air Brush Architectural Rendering

Fig. 17.22 South Street Seaport

DESIGN CONSULTANT: Imero Fiorentino,

Associates

RENDERER: David Stiles medium. Tempera with blackline on brown wrapping paper

Board Design Zeph

Fig. 17.23 Office Interior architect: Zeph Ginsberg, Architect renderer: Robert Zaccone, A.I.A. media: Pen and ink, watercolor, airbrush, and colored pencil on Bainbridge board

Fig. 17.22 South Street Seaport

DESIGN CONSULTANT: Imero Fiorentino,

Associates

RENDERER: David Stiles medium. Tempera with blackline on brown wrapping paper

Fig. 17.23 Office Interior architect: Zeph Ginsberg, Architect renderer: Robert Zaccone, A.I.A. media: Pen and ink, watercolor, airbrush, and colored pencil on Bainbridge board

A dalleiy of Professional Renderings / 223

the major developments thai helped shape the civilization of the world. The skills and techniques developed by architects since people first became interested in the pictorial aspects of architecture have been nurtured, then passed down toeach succeeding generation. The line of development from thearchitec-tural hieroglyphs of the Ancient Kingdom of Egypt to today's renderings is a straight one, varying now and then, but always growing and developing toward a more versatile presentation.

This lineof growth was made possible by many forces, some of them architectural, some not. Chief among them was the desire of all architects to bridge the gap between their own imaginations and those of oilier people who were not architects, to explain complicated thoughts in an uncomplicated manner. Today any subject matter may be pictured if the basic tools and a knowledge of techniques are ai hand.

Perspective, shades and shadows, and other techniques could be discovered only when someone provided paper and drawing media. The ability 10 render may have lain dormant, incapable of expression, lor centuries before paper appeared at the time of the Renaissance. To this one invention alone we owe eternal gratitude. If the landscape painter gave the stimulus 10 the quest for reality, so did the inventor of the camera, but neither could have produced rendering as we know it. It took the endless patience of many architects to experiment and to push into the unknown, as well as to try new media.

Fig. 1.32 Residence. (Architect and Ren-derer: William C. Wilkinson.)

Professional Architecture Rendering

Fig. 1.32 Residence. (Architect and Ren-derer: William C. Wilkinson.)

The Architect as Delineator

This brief outline of the history of delineation and the forces acting upon architectural rendering in the twentieth century points up the fact that, historically, i • 9

^g 17.24 "V.I.P. Apartment' Sedroom for the State of Kuwait a&chitect: Swanke Hayden Connell Ltd. «nderer: Robert Zaccone, A.I.A. media: Pen and ink, airbrush, watercolor. and colored pencil on Bainbridge board v.v

Pen And Ink Architecture

► g 17.25 "V.I.P. Apartment' Lnnng Room for the State of Kuwait architect: Swanke Hayden Connell Ltd. 5enderer: Robert Zaccone, a.I.a. media: Pen and ink, airbrush, watercolor, end colored pencil on Bainbridge board v.v

Pen And Ink Rendering BuildingsKuwait Airbrush

224 / Architectural Rendering

Bain Bridge Apartments Austin
Fig. 1.33 Office Building for Colgate Pal-molive. (Architect: The Austin Company. Architects & Engineers. Renderer: Albert O. Halse.)

>st architects have rendered their own designs to present to their clients, as in ijure 1.32, for example. The complexity of the modern architectural office does »t afford the major present-day architect the luxury of lime to deal with the < hanics of presentation and rendering. Thus presentation is delegated to the •st talented designers in the studio. This new responsibility has given great stige to that individual in the modern office (Figure 1.33). Even in small udios where the major architect is totally involved with all aspects of a project, :":en the delineator is a staff member who does all the office renderings, frequently, professional delineators who are known for their talents will be red as consultants. The most noted independent delineator and architect was lgh Ferriss, who established and inspired contemporary Tenderers. The drastic style of Ferriss is shown in the aerial perspective of Rockefeller Center in igure 1.34. Another outstanding renderer commissioned by architects was iiell Lewis. Again, Lewis's style, composition, and renderings are good exam-les for students and professional Tenderers (Figures 1.35 and 1.36). Today professional delineators are commissioned for their style (Figure 37), use of composition (Figure 1.38), specific technique (Figure 1.39), and

Hugh Ferriss Architecture
Fig. 1.34 Impression of the RCA, French, and British Buildings, Rockefeller Center, New York. (Architect: Reinhard & Hofmeister, Corbett, Harrison & MacMurray. Hood & Fouilhoux. Renderer: Hugh Ferriss.)

Fig 1.35 Bronxgat© Apartments. (Renderer: Schell Lewis. Architect: Alfred Eas-ton Poor. From the private collection of William C. Wilkinson.)

Fig 1.35 Bronxgat© Apartments. (Renderer: Schell Lewis. Architect: Alfred Eas-ton Poor. From the private collection of William C. Wilkinson.)

Architectural Delineation

RHOSXGATE APARIMBifIS

RHOSXGATE APARIMBifIS

skill wilh media (figure 1.40). A renderer may provide services not only to architects, but to advertising agencies, industrial designers, and large corporations.

No doubt all architects have at times felt the desire to know enough about delineation to be able to show clients concept ions of their prospective buildings. Many architects have not had sufficient specialized training in rendering and hesitate to sketch because they lack information about materials and techniques. With the directions found in this book, an architect will have to expend

Fig. 1.36 Housing Project. (Architect: Unknown. Renderer: Schell Lewis. From the private collection of William C. Wilkinson.)

Fig. 1.36 Housing Project. (Architect: Unknown. Renderer: Schell Lewis. From the private collection of William C. Wilkinson.)

Commercial Buildings Complex Sketch
v< Rpth!
Architecture City Complex With Rendering

Fig. 1.37 Proposed Singer Industrial Complex. (Renderer: Robert M. Zaccone. A.I.A. Real Estate Developer: Jerry Novak)

only a liltlo effort and persistence to master the various techniques. Proficiency will come with practice.

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  • LEON
    How to render building drawings using pen and ink?
    4 years ago

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