Axonometric Projection

Axonometric projection is a technique used in orthographic pictorials. Within orthographic projection, ax-onometric projection shows an image of an object as viewed from a skew direction in order to reveal more than one side in the same picture, unlike other orthographic projections, which show multiple views of the same object along different axes. Because with axonometric projections the scale of distant features is the same as for near features, such pictures will look distorted, especially if the object is mostly composed of rectangular features. The technique, however, is well suited for illustration purposes.

AUXILIARY VIEWS

Figure 5.14A,B Two examples of auxiliary-view projections. The illustrations show that the auxiliary views are not one of the primary views of the orthographic projection.

AUXILIARY VIEWS

Figure 5.14A,B Two examples of auxiliary-view projections. The illustrations show that the auxiliary views are not one of the primary views of the orthographic projection.

Primary Auxiliary Building
Figure 5.15 Another example of an auxiliary-view projection showing how it relates to an orthographic projection.

The distinguishing feature between projections and drawings is the unit of measurement employed. In projections a scale is constructed, which is used for measurements takeoff. The units of measurement used however are variable depending on the projection, and standard units of measurement are not used; in drawings, however, standard units of measurement (e.g. inches, feet, centimeter, etc.) are always used. The scales constructed for isometric, dimetric, and trimetric projections are always smaller than the standard units of measurements from which they are derived. This basically means that axono-metric projections are always smaller than axonometric drawings. An axonometric drawing of an object, although slightly distorted, is nevertheless visually as satisfactory as an axonometric projection of it. Axonometric drawings are usually preferred to axonometric projections because no time is wasted constructing the scales needed to generate the axonometric drawings.

An axonometric drawing is one that is accurately scaled and depicts an object that has been rotated on its axes and inclined from a regular parallel position to give it a three-dimensional appearance. The principal advantage of axonometric drawing is that one can use an existing orthographic plan without any redrawing. The plan is simply tilted to the desired angle. It should be noted that in much of Europe, an axonometric drawing always has its axis at a 45-degree angle; an isometric axis is either 30/30 degrees or 30/60 degrees. The most common axonometric drawings are isometric, dimetric, and trimetric (Figure 5.16). Typically in axonometric drawing, one axis of space is shown as the vertical.

Axonometric, or planometric, drawing, as it is sometimes called, is a method of drawing a plan view with a third dimension. It is used by interior designers, architects, and landscape gardeners. A plan view is drawn at a 45-degree angle, with the depth added vertically. All lengths are drawn at their true lengths, unlike oblique drawing. This gives the impression that you are viewing the objects from above. One advantage of axonometric drawing is that circles drawn on the top faces of objects can be drawn normally.

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Responses

  • emmi
    What is auxiliary view?
    2 months ago

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