Two View Drawings

Simple, symmetrical flat objects and cylindrical parts, such as sleeves, shafts, rods, or studs, require only two views to show the full details of construction. The two views usually include the front view and either a right side or left side view or a top or bottom view.

Figure 5.7C More examples of third angle projection that is primarily used in the United States and Canada. This type of projection produces two plan views and four side views. In third angle projection the left view is put on the left and the top view on the top.

THIRD ANGLE PROJECTION

Figure 5.7C More examples of third angle projection that is primarily used in the United States and Canada. This type of projection produces two plan views and four side views. In third angle projection the left view is put on the left and the top view on the top.

Figure 5.8 Two examples of single-view drawings, which are commonly used in industry to represent parts that are uniform in shape.

Features on both sides of a centerline shown on a drawing are the same size and shape. These equal-length short, parallel lines are placed outside the drawing of the object on its centerline (Figure 5.9). A hidden detail may be straight, curved, or cylindrical. Whatever the shape of the detail and regardless of the number of views, it is represented by a hidden edge or invisible edge line.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Greener Homes for You

Greener Homes for You

Get All The Support And Guidance You Need To Be A Success At Living Green. This Book Is One Of The Most Valuable Resources In The World When It Comes To Great Tips on Buying, Designing and Building an Eco-friendly Home.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment