Dr Adolph O Loe Residence 1902

Loe's residence is a compact, wood-sided Neoclassical Revival dwelling. The main roof is hipped, with cross-gable extensions, including a two-story entry portico. The large portico has an elaborate triangular pediment supported by colossal Corinthian columns. Corinthian pilasters decorate the front corners of the house and the back edges of the portico. Sidelights flank the central front door. The window treatment for this home is somewhat unusual windows on the main floor are...

Rd Avenue Housing Group 800 Block 18921893

The Victorian houses on the 800 block of 23rd Avenue are considered the finest extant grouping of Folk Victorian architecture in Seattle. Constructed in 1892-1893, the buildings have nearly identical plans and elevations. All of the houses are one and a half story, with steep gabled roofs, and machine-milled wooden gingerbreading, gable ornaments, and turned posts. These small houses were designed to include a parlor, dining room, and kitchen on the main floor, and bedrooms on the second level....

Ryer Residence pre1913

Ryer residence is a wood-shingled bungalow. The roof is gabled, with a projecting gabled dormer and portico, both supported by brackets. A pergola accents a large bank of transomed casement windows. The interior floors are oak. The living room and dining room have a considerable amount of fir wainscoat-ing, box-beams, built-in bookcases, and a large leaded glass china cupboard. The woodwork in the bedrooms was treated with aluminum bronze to create a gray color. The kitchen was painted a...

Capt M T Powers Residence circa 1900

This residence, although imposing in structure, was sparsely decorated, appropriate perhaps for Seattle police officer Capt. M. T. Powers, who lived here. In fact, the only thing that truly indicates its Victorian style is the irregular massing created by the double-story bay, and the shingle-accented cross gable. This house is an excellent example of what is now called a Free Classic Victorian, a house style that is often simpler in plan, with restrained ornamentation Capt. M. T. Powers...

Preface

MY INTRODUCTION to historic architecture came at an early age. My paternal grandfather lived in an old brick farmhouse just down the road from us in southwestern Virginia. Built in the Civil War era, it was a simple structure, with a dirt cellar and a large barn in the backyard. My maternal grandmother lived hundreds of miles away, in a newer house, built around 1890. Both of these homes had undergone major remodelings over the years, with layer after layer of paint and wallpaper applied,...

Raymond Ogden Residence 19121913

The Raymond-Ogden residence is another example of a brick Colonial Revival house. Its rectangular form is covered by a hipped roof. Three chimneys, one on each end and one in the center of the structure, anchor the home's symmetry. The central entry portico has slender Corinthian columns and a simple balustrade. The main entrance is unusually complex the center door is capped with a fanlight, while a full-length window with matching fanlight is located on either side. The second-story windows...

List Bussell Residence 1892

The List-Bussell residence, a remodeled Queen Anne, was covered with stucco in the late 1920s. The structure retained its roof massing, canted corners, turret, decorative glass, and interior woodwork. The house is large, fifteen rooms, and was sited to take full advantage of Lake Washington and mountain views. As a result, the front of the house faces away from the street. The original siding was horizontal wood with half-timbered detailing, decorative shingles, and ornate millwork. In 1928 new...

Various Victorian Residences circa 1890

These three houses illustrate the range of smaller Victorian residences that were once prevalent in Seattle. The most ornate of the three was probably the most typically urban in style. While small in size, all had the elaborate Queen Anne details found in much larger examples, including multiple surface treatments, clipped corners, and gingerbreading. The first example, 1009 East Madison, was the most ornate, and had irregular massing and a prominent front gable. Shingles and wood siding cover...

Parker Ferson Residence 1909

The Parker-Ferson residence is a large Neoclassical Revival house with the characteristic two-story portico supported by colossal columns. The main entry doors and flanking windows are slightly recessed. A balustraded porch beneath the main portico extends across the entire front of the house. (The ballustrades have been removed.) This residence, quite spacious with more than thirty rooms, has interior mahogany woodwork. The main foyer has a large cornice molding that replicates the exterior...

Arthur E Lyon Residence 19071908

A large portico graces the front of the two-story Arthur E. Lyon residence, while a one-story sunroom, located off to one side, breaks away from the typically symmetrical Neoclassical form. The home has a gabled roof, with the gable ridge running parallel to the road. The portico is rectangular, and covers much of the front fa ade, with an extended pedimented gable marking the entrance. The portico has six colossal Corinthian columns those directly under the pediment are paired, a single column...

G S Shirley Residence 1913

Shirley residence is a gabled bungalow, with a street-facing ridge line. The main gable of the house sweeps out with a curve toward to street. Eaves are exposed, and corbelled brackets provide visual support to the extended eaves. The house has shingle cladding, and a clinker brick front porch. Piers on the front porch draw upward into an arch. The cement porch floor and steps were colored red to match the clinker brick porch wall. The exterior was originally stained a reddish brown....

In Memoriam

In memory of Seattle's fantastic vintage buildings that have fallen victim to fire, inept remodels, or development. The demolition of the Stacy mansion after a fire, in 1960. Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, 7169 The demolition of the Stacy mansion after a fire, in 1960. Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, 7169 The Martin van Buren Stacy residence (1885), originally located at 308 Marion Street. Modern addition by Paul Thiry in the 1930s. Museum of History and Industry, Seattle,...

Th Avenue Housing Group 18901909 Gilman and Torbactia Residences

These houses were built on lower Queen Anne Hill in an area once known as Smith's Cove. At this time, Puget Sound's tide extended along 15th Avenue West, and these homes were only one block from the waterfront. The Gilman house, located at 2016 14th Avenue West, was constructed in 1891. The two-story structure has a gabled roof, an angled bay window on the main floor, and a rectangular tower. Historic photographs of the buildings show milled brackets and posts, now missing, although the main...

Belltown Cottages 1916

The three Belltown Cottages, are indicative of the small Craftsman Bungalow commonly found in Seattle. The Belltown Cottages were built in 1916 by William Hainsworth, who was a well-known Seattle builder and developer from the late 1890s until the 1920s. Single-family houses were typical Hainsworth projects, although he constructed a hotel toward the end of his career and may have designed additional cottage clusters as well. He was active in promoting development above Alki Beach, and he left...

Thomas Denny Jr Residence circa 1890

Thomas Denny, inhabited a large Queen Anne house as well. While the house was ornate, it was considerably less decorated than his father's, with only a single tower and a smaller porch. The chimney stacks and the main porch were also less ornamented. The house had an irregular roof massing, with an octagonal tower on the front corner, and cross gables on both the front and the side. The front cross gable added emphasis to the main entry, while the side cross...

William C Phillips Residence 1909

Phillips residence is a two-story, hipped-roof Colonial Revival building. The exterior of the structure is shingle clad, and while there is no front porch, a narrow, full-length concrete and brick stoop accentuates the entrance. The front door is the most heavily articulated design element of the house, with a transom and sidelights. The entrance is further articulated with a rounded pediment, supported by Doric columns. Block modillions, small rectangular brackets, are the...

Samuel Hyde Residence 19091910

The Samuel Hyde residence is a two-story, wood-frame structure with brick veneer. The front elevation is symmetrical, with a large two-story portico supported by paired colossal columns. The main entrance is flanked by sidelights, while a massive entablature supports a second-story balcony with balustrade. A double door, also flanked by sidelights, accesses the balcony. Windows are double hung those on the first story have elaborate terra-cotta surrounds, while second-story windows have less...

John H Ogden Residence 1914

Ogden residence is a street-gabled Craftsman with a concrete and brick porch. The porch is gabled, which repeats the decorative vergeboards and extended rafter tails. Paired posts with a centered decorative board support the portico instead of the more common tapered piers. The front door is to the left, and is flanked by a pair of double-hung windows. The upper sashes have small decorative lights on the perimeter. Four clustered windows to the right of the door light the living...

Henry Van Asselt Residence 1890

The Henry Van Asselt residence typifies the Queen Anne architectural style in some of the movement's most characteristic details irregular massing, a steeply pitched cross-gabled roof, first-floor canted corners with end brackets, an ornately decorated front porch (including a horseshoe arch), and Queen Anne windows. Images of this house suggest how houses can change over time. The photograph taken in 1955 shows a monochromatic paint job, an added second-floor window, perhaps for a bathroom...

Henry Owen Shuey Residence 1908

The Henry Owen Shuey residence, designed by architect E. S. Bell, is a large, two-story Neoclassical Revival house, rectangular in plan with a hipped roof. The projecting doublestory portico covers more than a third of the front of the house and is supported with Corinthian columns. A more subtle interpretation of these columns is repeated in the two-story pilasters marking the corners of the house. The structure does not have a symmetrical fa ade, since the entry portico is off center. The...

Bowen Huston Residence 1913

The Bowen-Huston residence is characterized by typical Craftsman horizontal design elements. The main gables are street facing, with shed roofs extending to cover a bay window at the entrance. A garage addition was completed in 1917, which introduced another front facing gable to the street fa ade. Vergeboards are raised at the gable peak, turning slightly upward at their ends, adding a faint Oriental accent to the design. Cedar shakes clad exterior wall surfaces. Windows have diamond panes on...

John C McMillan Residence 1903

Because of its corner lot location, the John C. McMillan residence has two impressive entries. The wood-sided house has a hipped roof with gabled dormers. Chimneys, while noticeable, are not nearly as ornate as those found on Tudor Revival or Queen Anne homes. A large balustraded portico, supported by colossal Corinthian columns, dominates the main elevation. Although the columns are paired on either side of the portico, there is only one pilaster for each set of columns along the back wall....

Richard Dwight Merrill Residence 19091910

The Richard Dwight Merrill residence is a two-story stuccoed structure. While most of the house has a flat roof, a massive cross-axial gable accents the three center bays. The gabled front section of the building projects slightly beyond the side bays. The front entrance is marked by a small Doric portico. A transom rests above the paneled front door. The interior of the home has a parquet hardwood floor, and wood paneling decorates formal areas. Richard Dwight Merrill was an executive with the...

George F Cotterill Residence 1910

Cotterill residence is a one-and-a-half story, side-gabled structure sided with rough-sawn cedar shakes. The full-length front porch is recessed under the main gable, and is supported by square piers. A large shed dormer houses two sets of triple windows on the second level of the front fa ade. Historic interior photos show plastered walls and ceilings. Hardwood floors were covered with a variety of rugs. The dining room housed an eclectic assortment of Victorian furniture in...

David Thomas Denny Residence 1888

David Denny House

The David Thomas Denny residence was a particularly elaborate example of Queen Anne architecture, with octagonal and round turrets, complex rooflines, and a substantial wraparound front porch. The articulated chimneys and porch gingerbreading were accented by multiple colors of paint. While windows on the upper stories have multiple lights and even a horseshoe arch-shaped window, the majority of the windows are rather simple one over ones, perhaps selected to frame territorial views....

Harvard Residence 19031909

The Harvard residence (so named because it is on Harvard Avenue) is a two-story, wood-frame, hipped-roof structure. A full basement and usable attic space make this home large, in excess of 7000 square feet. Like many of the Neoclassical Revival houses discussed above, this home has a two-story portico supported by paired colossal Corinthian columns. The main level has a centered mahogany door with transom windows, and windows on the main floor have leaded glass transoms. A balustraded front...

Victorian Builders Row Houses 1890

Classic Row House

Row houses were a common urban housing type during the late nineteenth century. They provided individual family homes, but their smaller floor plan, shared wall construction, and small yards made them more affordable than large, free-standing houses. This particularly fine example epitomized the style, with irregular massing, a steeply pitched roof, and a decorative ridge crest with finials. The walls were articulated through a variety of materials, including shingles, vertical siding, and...

Introduction

Madison Park

A Brief History of Seattle's Residential Architecture The first house in Seattle (built circa 1851, torn down in 1891). Seattle Public Library, 20779 The first house in Seattle (built circa 1851, torn down in 1891). Seattle Public Library, 20779 IN NOVEMBER 1851, two dozen settlers, led by David Thomas Denny, established a small settlement on Puget Sound in the area that is now West Seattle. They took shelter in a log cabin constructed during an earlier reconnaissance mission. The party was...

David E Skinner Residence 1905

Skinner residence has a similar form to many other Colonial Revival houses found on Seattle's Capitol Hill. The structure, designed by architect W. W. Sabin, has a gabled roof, with the ridge line facing the street. The center bay is pulled out and is further accented by a front-facing gable and a second-story tripartite window design capped with an ornamental shell motif. A curved front porch, now replaced by a rectangular one, covered the front entry. Quoins, painted in a shade...

George C Kinnear Residence 1885

Kinnear residence, designed by the Syracuse, New York, architectural firm of Kirby & Randall, was one of many stunning Queen Anne houses that gave the Queen Anne neighborhood its distinctive architectural character. The house, built in 1885, was an excellent example of late Victorian architecture. While exterior wall treatments were relatively sparse and lacked the usual array of applied gingerbreading, the house was rich with multiple projecting gables, a large tower, porches,...

Nathan Eckstein Residence 1915

The Nathan Eckstein residence is an elongated Colonial Revival house. The two-story brick dwelling has a side-facing gable, with three evenly spaced pedimented gabled dormers. A small, curved, entry porch is supported by Tuscan columns the porch seems too small for the massive fa ade. The entry doorway is the most elaborate detail on the house leaded glass fills the fanlight and sidelights. There are three evenly spaced one-over-one, double-hung windows on either side of the entry. The...

Reginald H Parsons Residence 1905

The two-and-a-half-story Parons-Gerrard residence is a derivative of the Dutch Colonial style. The roof is gam-breled, with the large front-facing gambrel intersecting a secondary gambrel to form the main body of the house. An addition to the right combines several roof types. The roofing material is slate, reminiscent of Colonial houses in the mid-Atlantic states. The brick foundation of the house extends to the base of the first-story windows, and stucco clads the rest of the structure....

Ballard Howe Residence 19001901

The Ballard-Howe residence has an imposing front fa ade. A small, centered, semicircular porch frames the main doorway. The porch is protected by a larger two-story entry portico, supported by colossal Ionic columns. Ionic pilasters accentuate the corners of the house. The front entry door has sidelights and a rectangular transom. Windows on the main floor have multilighted supersections, and are accentuated with block modillions. The second floor has a Palladian window-doorway combination,...

Classical Revivals

Sears Dutch Colonial Pinterest

Colonial Revival and Neoclassical Revival Georgian plantation of Westover, Virginia (circa 1750), in 1993. Georgian plantation of Westover, Virginia (circa 1750), in 1993. Dutch Colonial house in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia (late 1700s, reconstruction), in 1993. Dutch Colonial house in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia (late 1700s, reconstruction), in 1993. N THE UNITED STATES, the Colonial Revival and Neoclassical Revival styles share some Classical design features. The Colonial Revival...

Italianate Victorian Residence 1901

Victorian Fireplace 2nd Floor

This two-story building was one of a pair that were almost identical, both having hipped roofs, and similar floor plans and window articulation. The main distinguishing feature was the porch treatment. The house at 208 13th Avenue South has two porches, one on each floor. The main-level porch has gingerbreading, while the second-floor porch has columns and arch decorations. The house at 210 13th Avenue South (destroyed by fire) had a covered entry porch with an ornate column. These buildings...

Fisher Howell Residence circa 1892

While difficult to see through the dense plantings in front, this landmark house showcases a variety of Queen Anne detailing. Elaborate gingerbreading, cut vergeboards, and decorative shingles accent the cross-gabled roofline. A large front porch supported by turned pillars covers most of the front and side elevations. Bidmead and Annie Wright purchased this lot in 1891 with hopes to build a mansion that would rival the Dennys' in both scale and decoration. However, they fell on hard times, and...

Victorian

Classic University Architecture

Italianate, Queen Anne, and Folk Victorian The Arthur Armstrong Denny residence (1865), southeast corner of 1st Avenue and Union Street (demolished 1900), period photo. Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, SHS269 The Arthur Armstrong Denny residence (1865), southeast corner of 1st Avenue and Union Street (demolished 1900), period photo. Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, SHS269 Houses at 319 and 325 8th Avenue North, in 1911. The house at 319 is a small Folk Victorian, minimally...

Charles H Lilly Residence circa 1890

Lilly residence shows typical Queen Anne massing, with its bell tower, cross gables, and large wraparound front porch. The Palladian window in the upper gable (a tall arched window flanked by two smaller rectangular windows) and the paired Tuscan columns on the front porch are illustrative of a Queen Anne subtype sometimes referred to as Free Classic. While many people do not think of Classical columns and Palladian windows as particularly Victorian in style, perhaps one third of...

Edgar H Bucklin Residence 1908

Bucklin residence designed by English-born architect Frederick A. Sexton is a particularly elaborate example of the Colonial Revival style. The pyramidal roof, rectangular massing, and front gabled dormer are commonly found details in Seattle, but the large wraparound porch is an unusual feature. The ornamental woodwork on this house is elaborate, in keeping with Bucklin's profession in the lumber industry. The porch is supported with slender Ionic columns, and a pronounced...

Horace Adelbert Middaugh Residence 1901

The Horace Adelbert Middaugh residence, designed by the architect James E. Webster, is another fine example of a Neoclassical Revival house. A high foundation gives it pronounced stateliness. The two-story portico is supported by paired Ionic columns at the front, with single Ionic pilasters on the back wall. Dentil work over the entablature and the ornate balustrade along the top and on either side of the first level complete the portico. The front entry is reached by ascending an imposing...

Brehm Brothers Residences 1909

The house at 219 36 th Avenue North is one of a pair (the other is located at 221) on the street designed by noted Seattle architect Ellsworth Storey. The houses are now hidden under dense vegetation and are difficult to view from the street. They have classic Craftsman detailing low-pitched, gable rooflines, enhanced by thick brackets, exposed rafter ends, and vergeboards. Building materials for the two homes include wood shingles, clinker brick, and river rock. Both homes share a front...

Victor Steinbrueck Residence 1891

This two-story wood-clad house has cross gables, a tower on the left front, and a wraparound porch on the main fa ade. Victorian details include turned balusters and gingerbread-ing. Side windows have canted corners and decorative brackets. Fish-scale shingles adorn all the gables while the front cross gable has spindlework that is repeated on the wraparound front porch. Victor Steinbrueck, a Seattle architect, lived in this house and was instrumental in getting it listed as a landmark example...

Dr Albert S Kerry Residence 1917

Kerry residence, designed by architect Joseph S. Cot , is a two-story, wood-frame house with an uncommon Colonial Revival detail, a hooded doorway. This small portico-like structure shields the front stoop from rain. The hood molding over the door is a feature many associate with Italianate architecture, but it is found on Colonial architecture in Old Salem, North Carolina. A very un-Colonial bank of casement windows, shielded by a narrow shed roof, flanks the main entry....

Morris Atwood Residence 1915

Morris Atwood residence is another example of a Colonial Revival bungalow from the Craftsman era, showing how stylistic boundaries overlap each other. The simple rectangular structure has a gabled roof, with the ridge line facing the street. The Colonial detailing is sparse on this example as well, with the sole exterior Colonial elements being the symmetrical plan, simple pedi-mented door overhang, and multiglazed windows. Built-in bookcases, with glass doors were to the right of the...

A C Schneider Residence pre1912

Schneider residence is unusual in its extensive use of river rock for the foundation and chimney. A gabled roof covers the one-story structure, while a cross gable marks entry for the full-width recessed porch. Rafter ends are exposed, and the vergeboards have cut tails and ornamented bracing. The front door is slightly off center and flanked by diamond-paned sidelights. Clusters of three narrow windows on either end of the fa ade provide a well-lit interior. The original exterior...

Turner Koepf Residence 1883

This two-story house, thought to be the first house erected on Beacon Hill's summit, was built by Edward A. Turner in the Italianate style. The massing of the original house was rectangular in plan, with a pyramidal roof, quite common for Italianate homes at that time. The main fa ade originally had a two-story bay window and small, ornamented porches on both the front and the side. A subsequent owner, Frederick Koepf, remodeled the structure around 1907. During the remodeling process the...