Various Victorian Residences circa 1890

These three houses illustrate the range of smaller Victorian residences that were once prevalent in Seattle. The most ornate of the three was probably the most typically urban in style. While small in size, all had the elaborate Queen Anne details found in much larger examples, including multiple surface treatments, clipped corners, and gingerbreading. The first example, 1009 East Madison, was the most ornate, and had irregular massing and a prominent front gable. Shingles and wood siding cover the structure. A Queen Anne door, without colored glass, is similar in form to a Queen Anne window. The front fa├žade had canted corners with decorative scrollwork. Patterned shingles and an ornamented vergeboard decorated the upper half of the structure.

The house on 62nd Street is the largest example but the simplest in its ornamentation. The lot it sits on is large, suggesting a suburban setting. It shares massing similarities with late nineteenth-century farmhouses found in the region. It may very well have been part of a larger landtract, eventually subdivided as urban areas encroached. The simple, almost austere building form was accented with ornate gable scrollwork and turned porch posts.

The one-story Victorian probably had the smallest square footage of the three examples. Some might describe it as a "Victorian Bungalow" because of its small size or a "Folk Victorian" due to its simple ornamentation. Representative of small vernacular housing stock, ornamented to fit contemporary trends, the simple pyramidal roof of the building was masked by the gabled bay extension, a gabled dormer, and a small front porch. As a result, massing became one of the structure's major design elements. Victorian trim was minimal, and is evident only in the slender window surrounds, shingled front gable, and Tuscan porch columns.

A cross-gabled, two-story Victorian (circa 1890-1900), in the early twentieth century. Ballard Historical Society, 001/19931340001
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