Contracts

Various contractual agreements are needed between the parties involved in a building project. These agreements detail each party's responsibilities and can be in oral or written form. However, it is preferable to put down in writing the responsibilities of each party and what is expected. This can prevent future disagreements and serves as a legal contract binding the various parties. Contracts can be simple written agreements, or preprinted docu-

ASID Document IDllO

Abbreviated Form of Agreement for Interior Design Services

THIS DOCUMENT HAS IMPORTANT LEGAL CONSEQUENCES; CONSULTATION WITH AN ATTORNEY IS ENCOURAGED WITH RESPECT TO ITS COMPLETION OR MODIFICATION.

1994 EDITION

AGREEMENT

made as of the day of in the year of

(In words, indicate day, month and year)

BETWEEN the Owner:

and the Designer:

(Name and address)

For the following Project:

(Include detailed description of Project, location, address and scope. )

The Owner and the Designer agree as set forth below.

Major portions of this document are derived from AIA Document B177, Abbreviated Form of Agreement for Interior Design Services, ©1%0, copyright jointly held by The American Institute of Architects, 1735 New York Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006-5292, and The American Society of Interior Designers, 608 Massachusetts Ave., N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002-6006. Material in ASID Document ID1 lOdiffering from that found in AIA Document B177 is copyrighted 1994 by The American Society of Interior Designers. Reproduction of the material contained herein or substantial quotation of its provisions without written permission of ASID and AIA violates the copyright laws of the United States and will subject the violator to legal prosecution.

ASID DOCUMENT 10110 • ABBREVIATED FORM OF AGREEMENT FOR INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES • 1994 EDITION • ASID* ■SJSKVBV ©1994 • THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS, 608 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE, N.E., WASHINGTON, D.C. 20002-B&llBfl 6006 * AIA* • ©1994 • THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, 1735 NEW YORK AVENUE, N.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006-

A/nencansooctyoiirtenoroesQwrs 5292 • WARNING: Unlicensed photocopying violates U.S. copyright laws and will subject the vlolatorto legal prosecution. ID110—1994 1

ments (Figure 5-1), such as those provided by the AIA (American Institute of Architects), ASID (American Society of Interior Designers), and IIDA (International Interior Design Association). One important contract is that between the owner and contractor to do the work based on the drawings and specifications. There may also exist a whole series of other contracts between the contractor and subcontractor, or contractor and material supplier.

Construction Drawings

Construction drawings (often called working drawings) visually communicate the design and the information required to bring it into reality to everyone who is involved in the building process. These drawings generally follow a set of architectural drawing conventions that are widely accepted in the industry. However, there is not just one right way to do construction drawings. The office staff and project size, office standards, and the detail needed for custom fabrications can require construction drawings that vary from the conventions.

Organization of Construction Drawings

A variety of types of drawings are needed to accurately describe a project to the various tradespeople who will do the work. Two main types are what are generally called architectural and engineering drawings. For example, a concrete wall may be described as to its size and finish on the architectural drawings, but an engineering drawing is also needed to spell out the exact structural components, such as size and spacing of steel reinforcing in the wall. In addition to these two categories of drawings, there might be other specialty drawings that do not fit neatly within either one. For example, an architectural floor plan might show exact information about rooms, doors, windows, and other particulars, but items such as the exact placement of office desks and files would be found on a separate furniture installation plan, as seen in Figure 5-2. In interiors projects, the interior partition plans, details, and furniture drawings could be included with the architectural set, or they could be a completely separate set of drawings. Another type of specialized drawing might be a drapery installation plan for detailing specific window coverings.

Construction drawings are sequentially arranged by major components, as illustrated in Table 5-3. This sequence generally follows how the building is constructed, from the ground to the shell of the building to the interiors. However, the exact sequence of drawings and their content will vary from project to project and office to office. For example, the number of sheets of construction drawings

Figure 5-1 (opposite page) A preprinted ASID contract document.

Table 5-3 Typical Sheet Sequence for a Set of Construction Drawings

SHEET NO. DESCRIPTION

1. TITLE/COVER SHEET

Client, project, designer Index of sheets

Architectural symbols & abbreviations Perspective or other visuals

2. LOCATION OR SITE PLAN

This information might be on cover sheet

3. FOOTING AND FOUNDATION PLAN

(If required)

Begin with lowest floor first

5. BUILDING SECTIONS

Key to floor plans

6. EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS

(If required)

7. WALL SECTIONS

Drawn at large scale

8. INTERIOR ELEVATIONS

Show most prominent elevations

9. DETAILS

Drawn at large scale

Include legend and specific finishes

11. FURNITURE INSTALLATION PLAN (S)

Include legend and furniture placement

12. FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT PLAN (S)

(If required)

1 3. REFLECTED CEILING PLAN (S)

Include legend and coordinate with Electrical & Mechanical

14. ELECTRICAL PLAN (S) AND/OR POWER/COMMUNICATION PLAN (S) Include legend and reference to reflected ceiling plan

15. MECHANICAL PLAN (S)

16. SPECIFICATIONS

(If required, or put in separate booklet)

for a small residence may be smaller than for a commercial project. Figures 5-3, 5-4, and 5-5 show the example of a small model home where only three sheets comprise the whole set of construction drawings. A more complex commercial project might include as many as 21 sheets of drawings, as illustrated in Figure 5-6, which shows the cover sheet for a restaurant project with a table of contents listing the 21 sheets. In both cases, however, the sheet order remains similar. The sheets are numbered and bound sequentially as a set, for clarity and ease of use by contractors, subcontractors, and others involved in the project.

The sheet numbering system can vary according to the complexity of the project and office preference. For small projects, a simple numeric system can be used. Most offices prefer to use a system that identifies each area of specialty by a prefix, such as "A" for the architecture or "S" for structural. A list of the most common prefixes follows; however, other prefixes may be added as needed.

A Architecture

S Structural

M Mechanical

E Electrical

P Plumbing

I Interiors

F Finishes or Furniture

Q Equipment

Figure 5-3 This small set of construction drawings consists of only 3 sheets. Sheet 1 of 3 includes the foundation plan, floor plan, and a footing detail.

Figure 5-3 This small set of construction drawings consists of only 3 sheets. Sheet 1 of 3 includes the foundation plan, floor plan, and a footing detail.

Figure 5-4 Sheet 2 of 3 for this small house includes four exterior elevations, a roof plan, and a building section.

Figure 5-4 Sheet 2 of 3 for this small house includes four exterior elevations, a roof plan, and a building section.

ROOF PLAN

BUILDING SECTION

ROOF PLAN

BUILDING SECTION

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1

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ELEVATION

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Figure 5-5 Sheet 3 of 3 includes the electrical plan, electrical legend, and several interior elevations.

Figure 5-6 This cover sheet for a set of construction drawings for a commercial restaurant and lounge indicates the set consists of 21 sheets. The table of contents lists what can be found on each sheet.

Figure 5-6 This cover sheet for a set of construction drawings for a commercial restaurant and lounge indicates the set consists of 21 sheets. The table of contents lists what can be found on each sheet.

Figure 5-7 A small mock-up set of construction drawings is very helpful for indicating what will be drawn on each sheet and its sequence in the set.

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