Finish Plans

There are a variety of ways to communicate what interior finishes are required for a project. Traditionally, a finish schedule is developed in tabular form, listing each room or space and the specific types of finishes that are to be applied to the floors, walls, bases, and ceilings (Figure 11-1). Finish schedules are discussed in more detail in Chapter 10. In residential and small commercial projects where only a single finish is applied on each wall and one or two different floor finishes are used, a finish schedule works fairly well. In some interior projects, however, rooms have more than four walls, and they don't necessarily correspond to the compass directions keyed on the plan as north, south, east, and west. In such cases, it can be difficult to use only a finish schedule to accurately locate the corresponding finishes in the space. A room might also have complex angles and curves that cannot be effectively communicated by means of a finish schedule.

In large or complex interiors, when there is more than one type of finish on each wall, or when there are other complex finish configurations, such as a tile design on a floor, a finish plan is more appropriate. A finish plan, as shown in Figure 11-2, shows the finish material to be applied to wall and floor surfaces graphically, with a corresponding legend (Figure 11-3).

The finish plan codes and graphically indicates where each surface treatment goes. The code is then keyed to a legend and cross-referenced to written specifications, if necessary. The legend specifies the exact material, manufacturer, catalog number, color, fire rating, and any other specific information necessary for a successful application, as illustrated in Figure 11-4. A number or a combination of

ROOM FINISH SCHEDULE

ROOM

FLOOR

BASE

WALLS

CEILING

NOTES

Q

Ui t-

-I t-

t-

PTP. Grp. BP.

m

i 0

z >

0-

u

D

8 <

FOYER

COFFERED CEILING

LIVING ROOM

PINING ROOM

KITCHEN

BREAKFAST NOOK

GREAT ROOM

OFFICE

LAUNPRT/ MUP ROOM

MASTER BEDROOM

MASTER BATH

POWDER ROOM

CERAMIC TILE WAINSCOT

BEDROOM 1

BEDROOM 2

BATHROOM (2ND FLRJ

BONUS ROOM

Figure 11-1 Room-finish schedules are commonly used in interior construction plans.

Figure 11-1 Room-finish schedules are commonly used in interior construction plans.

alphabetical letters and a number generally forms the code. For example, all carpet floor notations could be preceded with a "C" or "FC" for floor covering, and then given numerical designations such as FC-1, FC-2, and so on, as shown in Figure 11-5. The code for a wall treatment may indicate a single wall finish, such as "P" for paint, or a combination of treatments, such as WC-1/WB-2 for wainscot and wall base. Some common abbreviations are shown in Table 11-1. If the wall base finish or the trim is the same through-

Finishing Drawings Construction

PARTIAL FINISH PLAN Af PLOT

Figure 11-2 Finish plans show where finish materials are to be applied to wall and floor surfaces.

Figure 11-3 A finish legend that accompanies a finish plan.

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Responses

  • Ferdinand
    What is a finish plan?
    9 months ago
  • Elvira
    What is a finsih plan archtecture?
    3 months ago
  • Enrica
    How do you indicate flooring ON FINISH PLAN CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS?
    14 days ago

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