Partial First Floor Furniture Plan

Figure 12-4 A job book details each piece of furniture, such as this table, T11, and references it to the furniture installation plan.

PROJECT:

QUANTITY;

MANF;

MODEL;

DESCRIPTION:

FINISH;

LOCATION:

ILLUSTRATION:

johnson & klinker, inc.

vecta ginkgo biloba - 606902

round conference table with wood veneer top and aluminum tube base w: 48" dia. h: 29"

natural cherry conference room 2004

DATE:

REVISION:

The schedule, which is located adjacent to the furniture plan, may simply be in the form of a legend indicating codes and the generic types of furniture they refer to, such as C for chair or TA for table, and not specific product information. The codes must then be explained in more detail in the job or control book, as seen in the example in Figure 12-4. In the job or control book, trade names, product numbers, color names, and other specific details are given. A photograph or line drawing may be included as well as an actual piece of the finish or upholstery fabric. Figure 12-5 shows a page from a job book in which a chair is specified for a project.

For a more complex project, the code may consist of a combination of letters and numbers, such as C014/409, where C stands for chair, 014 stands for the 14th type of chair, and 409 after the slash refers to the room number where the chair is to be located. These codes must be explained in the control book and specifications.

On large office-building projects with open-plan workstations, each workstation and panel cluster may be coded as a unit and keyed to the "systems" furniture division of the furnishings specifications. That is, instead of identifying each piece of furniture and component on the plan, each workstation may be designated by a code. The code may be a simple designator, such as SI or S5, meaning merely systems furniture group one or five. Codes may also be more complex and have designators that relate to the size and/or job function of the workstation, such as A being the largest, for executives; B for middle management; C for secretaries, and so on. These may be further broken down as Al, A2, etc., depending on the number of different configurations and/or components. Other prefixes, such as WS for open-plan workstations or PO for private offices, may also be added to the code for clarity as to the specific type of work space and location. Thus, a code such as POA1 or WSC3 may appear on the plan and in the schedule (see Figure 12-6).

Furniture plans are also used to itemize the furnishings for pricing and ordering as well as to show the installers the exact location and orientation of each piece during move-in. The furniture plan is sometimes aligned with the electrical and power/communication plans, because the exact location of many of these outlets is directly related to the location and orientation of the furniture. See Figure 12-7 for an example of a combined power/communication and furniture plan.

PROJECT:

QUANTITY:

MANF:

MODEL:

DESCRIPTION:

Scale of Furniture Installation Plans

Furniture installation plans are drawn at as small a scale as possible to reduce the amount of space they take up on the sheet. The furniture drawn in plan view may be simplistic in form to prevent clutter. For example, a chair could be drawn as a rectangle, with no back or arms depicted. However, most designers prefer to portray the furniture shape in more detail. Today, this is particularly easy as many manufacturers supply furniture templates that can be directly transferred into the designer's CAD program. As there is often not a lot of detailed information that needs to be drawn in the floor-plan view, a scale of Vs" = l'-O" (1:100 metric) is generally used. However, if more detail is needed to clarify the exact configurations or elements of pieces, a scale of V4" = l'-O" (1:50 metric) or larger can be used.

FINISH:

UPHOLSTERY;

LOCATION:

ILLUSTRATION:

Drafting Standards for Furniture Installation Plans

Furniture can be identified on plans using numerical codes, graphic depictions of the object, or a combination of these, depending on the complexity and size of the project. Most design firms prefer a simple

DATE:

--Figure 12-5 The job book johnson & klinker. inc. often includes a piece of

C3 the fabric and a drawing

knoll bulldog management (7a1-1-b5g-h-k722/2)

medium back upholstered conference chair with arms w: 25 vi d: 21

seath: 16"-21" arm h: 23%" -28%" overall h: 30" - 39"

dark grey knoll textiles/ chopsticks/ jade conference room 2004

REVISION:

Workstation Plan

Figure 12-6 In this furniture plan, workstations are coded WSA1, WSC1, etc. — then specified in detail in the job book or schedule.

Figure 12-7 This plan combines the power/communication and furniture plans in order to accurately locate electrical devices in relation to furniture and other cabinetry.

drawing convention that labels furniture based on their generic category. For example, a chair is designated C-l, C-2, C-3, etc. Sofas are called S-l, S-2, S-3, and tables are T-l, T-2, and T-3. An identifying symbol is drawn around the designation on the floor plan to isolate the key clearly from other information on the drawing (Figure 12-8). In some cases, symbols can be used to identify generic groups of furniture. For example, hexagons might be used for chairs, rectangles for desks, and circles for tables. In all of these methods, it is imperative that the coded information be clear, concise, and legible.

Installationsplan

DUPLEX POLUER RECEPTACLE « IS" ARE. QIJADRAPLEX POIUER RECEPTACLE e IS' AE.F.

Site Plan Reference Numbers

Another method of coding furniture on an installation plan is to use the coding system on specifications or accompanying schedule for easy cross-referencing. This convention assigns a reference number to each item. For example, all tables are indexed as belonging to the 15,000 series. Specific tables could then be itemized as 15100, 15200, and so forth, as illustrated in Figure 12-9. The first two digits reference all tables to the specifications and the last four digits can be used to identify and describe the specific table.

A variety of information can be included in the schedule accompanying a furniture installation plan. Figure 12-10 shows the basic information to be included in the furniture schedule. Design firms may augment this basic information as necessary for the scope, size, and complexity of the project. Firms vary as to

Figure 12-9 In this example, the furniture is coded with a series of numbers. The chairs are all in the 16000 series. Their specific characteristics are reflected in the numbers following the 16 in each code.

17675

Figure The Furniture For Floor Plan

FURNITURE SCHEDULE

Figure 12-10 The furniture schedule lists the specifics represented by the symbol in the floor plan. Other columns might be added for the quantity, size, manufacturer, fabric/finish, room location, and other information needed to order and install the furniture.

KEY

QUANTITY

ITEM

MFGt'R / CATALOG NO.

FABRIC / FINISH

REMARKS

CI

12

CHAIR

BROWN JORDANi 4320-2001

HJALL-PRIDE, INC. KL I2&1 KALEIDOSCOPE WIDTH:54'± NO REPEAT

FINISH: NATURAL± CLASS A FLAME SPREAD

Bl

1

BOOTH

SHELBY WILLIAMS 81-564 LOUNGE SETTEE-CUSTOM SIZE PER PLANS

A. BACK: UJAVERLY FABRICS £>011, WIDTH 54' B. SEAT: MAHARAM FABRICS 453S WOOL "28 FOREST! WIDTH 54' REPEAT 0.

FLAME PROOF PER CHICAGO BUILDING CODE

Tl

4

TABLE

ICF: CARIBE TABLE* LI MARI

A. BASE: POLISHED BRASS fSMOOTH SURFACE «458; B. TOP: PLASTIC LAMINATE FORMICA NATURAL ALMONDD3fcl. ONE INCH BRASS BAND INSET INTO TOP PERIMETER 2' FROM TABLE EDGE

3i> INCHES SQUARE, WITH DROP LEAVES TO 54 INCHES

SI

5

SOFA

KRIES, INC / SHOWPLACE SERIES 9501

BODY: SCHUMACHER AMETHYST PALLADIO TEXTURE, WIDTH 54', REPEAT 0 PILLOWS: MADDEN DESIGNS, JADE SERIES AT13

YARDAGE: 11 YARDS FLAMEPROOF PER CHICAGO BUILDING CODE

whether the "quantity" column is to be included in this schedule. Some firms prefer to leave the exact count of the pieces up to the furniture representative supplying the items, whereas other firms want to make sure of the exact count before the final order is placed. In such cases, the furniture items can be cross-checked between the purchase orders and the location on the floor plan.

Dimensioning Furniture Installation Plans

Generally, there is not a lot of dimensioning placed on the furniture installation plan. As long as the plan is drawn to scale and the exact sizes are known, the pieces should fit into their assigned spaces and arrangements. However, in some cases, such as with systems furniture, critical clearances and alignment with other items might need to be dimensioned directly on the plan. In these instances, references should be given that are easily obtainable in the field. For example, a dimension might be from the face of a wall, column, or imaginary centerline of a room, as illustrated in Figure 12-11.

Designation of Materials

If the furniture installation plan is drawn at a scale of V2" = 1'-0" (1:20 metric), material designations might be included on the piece shown in the plan view. However, this designation of materials is often reserved for presentation drawings rather than included in the construction drawings. Designers must use their discretion or the office standard when deciding whether to include material designations. In many CAD libraries, the software for rendering the material is available, but retaining the scale of the drawing and the clear placement of the furniture should take precedence over making the drawing a visual delight.

39"

Checklist for Furniture Installation Plans

General

• Title the drawing, note its scale, and identify north (or reference direction).

• Title the accompanying furniture schedule and key it to the plan.

• Place the furniture schedule on the same sheet as the furniture plan (preferred) or on a sheet immediately preceding or following the plan.

• Clean up the plan (or in CAD, turn off superfluous information) so the furniture and key codes are clear, dark, and legible.

• Number or name all applicable rooms/spaces.

• Dot in wheelchair access circles and other special furniture items to show compliance with ADA standards (where applicable).

• Carefully check placement of furniture against the electrical and lighting plans for coordination with electrical and luminaire devices.

Notations

• Cross-reference the plan (and schedule If applicable) to other drawings that might contain Information critical to the furniture Installation plan.

• Note special features, clearances, alignments, and other Important Items.

• Cross-reference the furniture Installation plan and schedule, carefully checking for accuracy and completeness of Information.

• Add notes about Issues the Installer should be alert to when placing the furniture.

Dimensions

• Dimension clearances, alignments, and other controlling factors.

• Call out for Installer or contractor to verify existing dimensions of the space/structure against those shown on the Installation plan, and to verify these with the designer before furniture Installation.

Interior spaces are composed of more than just floors, walls, ceilings, and furniture. Other elements are often needed to enrich and support a space to make it more "completed" and habitable. Furniture, furnishings, and equipment comprise what is commonly referred to as the FF&E program. Furniture was discussed in Chapter 12. The last two areas of the FF&E program, furnishings and equipment, are discussed in this chapter. Furnishings and equipment are an integral part of the interior environment and generally selected by the interior designer. They are not items that are just "thrown together" and placed in the interiors. Sometimes interior designers, when referring to furnishings and some specialized equipment, such as for retail spaces, use the term fixtures.

Furnishings are those items that add the finishing touch to spaces. Furnishings can be utilitarian or decorative, and serve to enhance the architectural features of the space as well as meet user needs and aspirations. The selection and display of furnishings can impart a person's individual character to a space. Generally, furnishings can include accessories, artwork, plants, graphics, and special freestanding or constructed items, as illustrated in Figure 13-1. Accessories could include baskets, figurines, collections, clocks, pottery, or many other items. Accessories might provide a sense of uniqueness or freshness, or be in a serious vein. The selection and display of furnishings follows the principles of design, with attention to their suitability for the total environment.

Most people like to surround themselves with objects that have special meaning. Items such as personal collections or cherished

How To Sell Furniture

How To Sell Furniture

Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

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Responses

  • DOREEN
    How to create partial floor plans from overall floor plan?
    9 months ago
  • t button
    What drawing ID should furniture plans be?
    8 months ago

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