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^ o off mountains. After working on a painting, the wife can step out onto the porch, where a single fruit tree deftly planted by Kiley provides perspective to the distant views. In the last building of the complex, one finds modest-size guest quarters and a generous three-car garage with roll-up industrial steel doors.

Not immediately evident to the onlooker, order and irregularity combine in interesting ways throughout the buildings. For example, the front of the main house is not symmetrical with the back, which is rotated away, bending to open to views and gain space where needed. In addition, the threshold on the guest house entrance is not parallel to the door, and the walls of some of the structures are not perpendicular to one another. Asymmetry both creates interest and accomplishes certain tasks, such as enlarging a room and opening it up to light. Says Rose, "During my career, I have become interested in misalignment, without it being an error, trusting my instincts to allow things to adjust asymmetrically for some experiential purpose. This introduces a kind of irritant or odd note to a fairly disciplined thing, sliding and rotating volumes with precision and grace."

The total square footage of the ensemble is 10,000, yet the buildings, broken into discrete parts as they are, convey modest dimensions.

"The north and south fields would suddenly be measurable and finite if a big lumbering house were sited there," Rose explains. By breaking up the house into pieces, the field remains unified both within itself and with the parts of the complex.

Rose refers to his work as a conversation between the volumes of the house and the landscape. The parts of the whole play a melody: The planes of the rooflines, for example, respond to each other. At the same time, the contrast between concrete and wood will slowly erode from the weather, trees will mature and cover the walls, and walls will become stained. Over time, nature and the man-made will continue the evolution of melding with each other in ways that white clapboard could never have accommodated. ■

Sources

Windows: William Parry Window Company

Cabinetmaker: Menuiserie Mont Royal

Kitchen floors: Caswell Flooring Cement board: CemBonit

For more information on this project, go to Residential at www.archrecord.com.

Taylor_Smyth archi"™ly Pr~~abm ages gracefully in its hillside context

By Kelly Rude

Though three generations of Toronto's well-heeled have had cottages at Lake Simcoe, one hour's drive north of the city, outsiders would never guess the modest cabins were here, never mind occupied. But the rustic and romantic true grit of Toronto's last century of style is still very much alive, at least in this neck of the woods.

"My clients hike and camp when they're here," Toronto architect Michael Taylor explains on the drive up to Sunset Cabin, on an autumn day with maples at their prime, bathed in a light at once crisp and clear, soft and mellow. "It is about the light and the views," says Taylor, as we approach his clients' main cottage with a west view to the lake.

The cottage owners, a couple, commissioned Taylor_Smyth architects to design a private cabin separate but related to the rest of an eclectic mix of sleeping shelters (one is simply a canvas tent stretched on a wood frame) that dot the 1-acre property. The couple, their four adult children, and a steady flow of visitors ensure that the main house and three sleeping cabins on the property are occupied. While two of the cabins are near the main house, this one is about 150 feet away, perched on a rock on a hillside that gently slopes toward the lake.

"We needed to get away from everyone and have a space of our own," explains the wife. "Because at any one time there could be 10 to 15 people sleeping over." Previously, she and her husband would take refuge in one of the five bedrooms in the main house, which buzzed with energy whenever a crowd showed up for the evening meal. "And the location of the new cabin was our favorite place to sit at sunset."

Given that the site had such a clear focus, the architects chose to frame the experience of it as unobtrusively as possible, with a simple, flat-roofed glass box, sheathed on three sides with a varied, rhythmic pattern of 1-by-3-inch horizontal cedar slats. Fabricated in a parking lot in Toronto next to a commercial building owned by the client, the structure was then

Canadian design journalist Kelly Rude contributes to a variety of magazines and journals, including Interior Design, Surface, Azure, and Canadian Interiors.

Project: Sunset Cabin, Lake Simcoe, near Toronto, Canada Architect: Taylor_Smyth architects— Michael Taylor, partner in charge;

Michael LaFreniere, project team Consultant: GROW (landscape) General contractor: The Brothers Dressler, with Jaan Poldaas

Overlooking Lake Simcoe, the cabin boasts excellent views. The floor of the building extends outside toward the lake to become a deck. A

screen of 1-by-3-inch horizontal cedar slats covers portions of the floor-to-ceiling glass windows, contrasting openness with protection.

Overlooking Lake Simcoe, the cabin boasts excellent views. The floor of the building extends outside toward the lake to become a deck. A

screen of 1-by-3-inch horizontal cedar slats covers portions of the floor-to-ceiling glass windows, contrasting openness with protection.

1. Porch

2. Cabin

3. Deck

4. Outdoor shower

5. Bath

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