Insulated Light Wood Frame

How to Build An Aviary

Building Your Own Outdoor Aviary

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People living in high rainfall areas, heavy snow country, or areas with abundant access to wood products, can secure light, wood frame rafters to built-in extended eaves. We recommend light wood frame as an alternative to larger dimensional lumber. Not because the dome cant take the weight, but to reduce timber consumption (Fig. 13.9).

Exterior wood-frame roof systems can be insulated, sheathed with wood, and covered with any kind of roofing material, like metal, wood, asphalt shingles, or Eco-shingles. A wood frame can be built right over the bag work of the dome without any mud plaster (Fig. 13.10).

Insulating Dome Roof

The "Lighthouse" style extended eaves only

"Japanese bird cage" style light wood frame attached to extended eaves

13.9: Earthbag dome with a light, wood-frame roof attached to built-in eaves.

External Straw-Bale-Insulated Roof

Stacking straw bales on top of long, beefy extended eaves can create another version of a living roof. The eaves would need to be sheathed, and some sort of waterproof membrane, like sturdy EPDM heavy plastic pond liner, cut into large sections and overlapped like shingles over the entire dome. The bales can then be stacked and wedged at an angle with bale flakes, cob, clay/straw blocks, etc. An earthen mud mortar slathered in between each course of bales will help to stick them together. Wire cable cinched tight at the center of every two or three courses is another way to secure them.

The Lighthouse style, extended eaves only

Japanese bird cage style, light wood frame attached to extended eaves

13.10: Split-screen image of two styles of wood roof over an earthbag dome.

In a dry climate, the cap can be plugged with sculpted cob and lime plaster. Straw bales last many years exposed in the desert as long as they are kept up off the ground. In a moister climate, the bales can be encouraged to grow into a living roof. Planting tough grasses with migrating root systems (like Bermuda), or sturdy vines (Virginia creeper, ivy, honeysuckle, etc) onto the surface of the bales and into the mud material packed between them would be fun to try. The initial cost is minimal; if the bales fail over time, they can be replaced with more bales or a shingled roof.

lime-stabilized earth cap extended eaves sheathed and shingled eaves 3' - 6'

loft rafter construction in a spoke wheel pattern, supported by a chain suspended from plate on topof dome lime-stabilized earth cap extended eaves sheathed and shingled loft rafter construction in a spoke wheel pattern, supported by a chain suspended from plate on topof dome mortar bales with thick er eaves 3' - 6'

Toit Vout Cathedrale Gothique

Create springline for bales with a cob wedge dormed window

French drain mortar bales with thick er

Create springline for bales with a cob wedge dormed window

French drain

13.11: Scale model of a 20-foot (6 m) diameter earthbag dome with external straw-bale-insulated roof.

CHAPTER 14

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