Background Rationale of adaptive reuse

In Chapter 3 the focus was on the general principles of converting buildings other purposes. The adaptive reuse of property is considered in more detail in this chapter. It is concerned with converting buildings into other, more effective and efficient uses. More effective here means that the adapted property serves the client's requirements better and gives the building an extended useful life. For example, this may be because the building's appearance is not in keeping with the corporate...

What is adaptation Definitions

'Adaptation' is derived from the Latin ad (to) and aptare (fit). In the context of this book it is taken to include any work to a building over and above maintenance to change its capacity, function or performance (i.e. any intervention to adjust, reuse or upgrade a building to suit new conditions or requirements). As regards existing buildings adaptation has traditionally come to have a narrower meaning that suggests mainly some form of change of use. The term has also been commonly used to...

Commercial buildings Building types

Before looking at the constructional characteristics of commercial buildings it would be useful to classify their main forms of construction. They can be divided into two broad groups unframed and framed. Unframed Solid or cavity wall construction (usually up to a maximum of six storeys) or column and slab construction (usually up to a maximum of about 12 storeys). Framed Steel or reinforced concrete - skeletal form for multi-storey blocks. Table 2.5 Typical forms of modern construction Type of...

Nonresidential refurbishment Rationale and strategy

The primary objective of any refurbishment programme is to improve a building's overall performance and enhance productivity (see Figures 8.2 and 8.3). Office buildings are no exception in this regard. Property investors know that the security of their investment is highly dependent upon the quality of the building they own. Giving the building a facelift is a distinctive way of enhancing its appearance and durability. Traditionally, most office buildings were refurbished, if at all, only once...

Office floor excluding tenantsfitout

Renewing the floor and ceiling finishes of office floor space can give it a rejuvenated look. The flooring can comprise close-pile anti-static carpeting in common office areas and cushioned sheet linoleum or vinyl for the circulation spaces. The installation of suspended ceilings with low-glare integrated light fittings can transform a previously tired looking space. These facilities are often a focal point for important meetings or presentations. They therefore usually demand a superior level...

Integrity of the building Generally

In this context integrity is a concept that relates to what extent or degree the building retains its original characteristics, form, nature and use. There are four key aspects of building integrity architectural, constructional, cultural and structural, each of which must be considered in any adaptation scheme, particularly one involving a change of use. An adaptive reuse whilst involving little alteration to a building's exterior, could involve propose radical change to its interior. This may...

Roof extensions Means

In tight sites the capacity to extend a building laterally can be severely limited. Mid-terraced properties for example can only allow an extension of a suitable size at the rear. Even so there may be little if any room Schematic vertical cross-section (not to scale) Schematic vertical cross-section (not to scale) A. Traditional method of forming a light-well with skylight. B. Modern method of forming a light-well using a reflective duct (e.g. Sun Pipe). 1. New opening formed in existing roof....

Using project management Preamble

Any construction work, from the smallest adaptation job to the largest new-build scheme will require some form of project management if the critical success factors (time, cost, safety and quality) are to be achieved. This form of management has become the main methodology used to administer major projects from space programmes to new car designs as well as large building work. It can also be employed in medium-large scale adaptation schemes that require careful administration and control...

Roof abutments

The connection arrangement between the flat roof of a building and an extension of the same construction is shown in Figure 5.21. The detail involving floors with downstand edge beams is basically the same, except for the parapet upstands. Matching the pitched roof coverings of an extension to those of an existing building is often difficult to achieve. The slate or tile coverings of the new roof are inevitably cleaner and probably sounder than the existing. This problem is especially...

Building regulations compliance

The code compliance and space planning problems of an adaptive reuse can be highlighted in the proposed conversion of a large office building to flats. The property, which was built in the late 1930s, is shown in Figure 4.15. Its of Art Deco style and has Grade 2 listed status. The following building elements therefore require minimum intervention i.e. the original appearance to remain and retention of the original interior features of the entrance lobby, hall and stairwell. The fenestration...

Generally

As shown in Chapter 6 over-roofing is becoming a common way of replacing existing flat roofs. In this section we shall look at ways of upgrading flat and pitched roofs that do not involve changing their basic profile. Such upgrading works entail one or a combination of the following three measures 1. Replacing the existing roof coverings with similar or new material to enhance its appearance and weather resistance. On refurbishment, Capex overcladding systems can extend the life of a building...

Walltie repairs and renewal Traditional masonry

Wall-tie failure is primarily caused by premature corrosion of the galvanized mild steel ties see Figure 7.9 . The BRE IP 12 90 reported that this problem could eventually affect virtually all of the cavity-walled buildings constructed before 1981. After that time wall ties were designed to have much higher levels of resistance to corrosion. This means that some 10 million dwellings are potentially at risk of this problem Good Repair Guide GRG 4, 1997 . Schematic cross-section not to scale 1....

Anhydrite screeds

Part of the refurbishment of a building may involve refurbishing the concrete ground or upper floors. Installing an anhydrite screed over an existing sound concrete substrate is one way of doing this. Moreover, anhydrite screeds work well with underfloor heating. Concrete ground-bearing slab with insulation above slab 1 The surface below the insulation should be both smooth and flat to a tolerance of 5 mm in 3 m power-trowelled or levelled with screed . Concrete ground-bearing slab with...

Types of underpinning Traditional

Pier And Beam Foundations Sandy Soil

The main traditional forms of underpinning are brick with concrete footings, and mass concrete. They usually have a maximum depth of about 3 m and when complete are generally continuous over the length Table 7.5 Main types of modern underpinning methods Grouting This involves injecting a viscous cement or resin grout into the ground to 'stiffen' and or expand the soil under the wall affected by subsidence. It is more suited for use in non-cohesive soils such as gravely and sandy soils. Needle...

Repairs to reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete

Reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete RAAC was a popular choice as structural material in educational, commercial and industrial buildings between 1950 and 1980. It was primarily used for pre-cast wall panels and flat roof planks in factory and warehouse blocks. 'Siporex', for example, was a common proprietary brand of RAAC wall panel. However, the term autoclaved aerated concrete AAC is a slight misnomer in that it is not a true form of concrete. AAC is not concrete in its constituent...