Vaulted loadbearing structures in solid construction

Compression structures: arches and barrel vaults

Fig. 36: Succession of stacked arches: sectional concept in order to omit superfluous material. The arch construction is sensible from an engineering and an economic viewpoint.

Pont du Gard, Roman aqueduct at Nîmes (F), 1st century AD

Fig. 36: Succession of stacked arches: sectional concept in order to omit superfluous material. The arch construction is sensible from an engineering and an economic viewpoint.

Pont du Gard, Roman aqueduct at Nîmes (F), 1st century AD

Fig. 39: Brickwork vaulting as permanent formwork to concrete above, with tie bars to accommodate thrust. The vaulted construction here has an architectural, space-forming value.

Le Corbusier: Jaoul houses, Paris (F), 1955

Fig. 39: Brickwork vaulting as permanent formwork to concrete above, with tie bars to accommodate thrust. The vaulted construction here has an architectural, space-forming value.

Le Corbusier: Jaoul houses, Paris (F), 1955

A compression structure allows the "disadvantage" of the weight of the construction to become an inherent advantage of the loadbearing structure.

The erection of arched and vaulted constructions follows identical criteria, also because a barrel vault is nothing

Fig. 38: The reinforced concrete tie accommodates the thrust and relieves the wall below.

Louis I. Kahn: Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India), 1962-74

Fig. 38: The reinforced concrete tie accommodates the thrust and relieves the wall below.

Louis I. Kahn: Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India), 1962-74

other than an arch-shape curved surface, or rather a succession of parallel arches. The question of lateral stability is more significant with an arch because it is usually part of a wall subject to the aforementioned conditions (see "Vertical loadbearing structures").

In the Louis I. Kahn example the double arches relieve the wall below and concentrate the forces at the supports. But the wall does not need to be strengthened as a result of this because the r einforced concrete tie beneath the arches takes the thrust so that all the loads are transferred vertically. The hopper-like reduction in thickness of the wall below the arches merely indicates those parts of the wall that carry practically no vertical loads.

The lateral thrust increases as the rise of the arch decreases. The shallow barrel-vault roofs of Le Corbusier's Jaoul houses were therefore reinforced with steel tie bars. At the aqueduct in Nîmes, on the other hand, such tie bars were unnecessary because a succession of identical arches - irrespective of the rise - results in the coincidence of opposing identical horizontal forces and hence purely vertical loads. However, the end bays need special treatment.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Solar Power Sensation V2

Solar Power Sensation V2

This is a product all about solar power. Within this product you will get 24 videos, 5 guides, reviews and much more. This product is great for affiliate marketers who is trying to market products all about alternative energy.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment