Woodbased products

Fibreboards

Fig. 23: Shaped MDF

MDF (medium density fibreboard) can be shapec with templates under the action of heat and moisture

Fig. 23: Shaped MDF

MDF (medium density fibreboard) can be shapec with templates under the action of heat and moisture

Fibreboards

Fibreboards consist of a mixture of prepared long wood fibres (residues such as untreated sawmill waste and forestry thinnings, usually crushed softwood) and fillers that are pressed together with the help of water, pressure and heat without the need for any further binders. The structure of the wood is no longer recognisable. The strength of fibreboards varies from low to high depending on the degree of compaction.

The range of products on offer extends from soft insulating boards to medium-hard to hard boards. The latter are distinguished by their very hard surfaces and abrasion resistance; the soft insulating boards, on the other hand, exhibit high sorption and good heat storage capacity. Fibreboards are suitable for interior fitting-out works, roof decking, packaging, fillings and as sound and thermal insulation.

Fibreboards are produced using the wet method, which distinguishes them from a related type of board, the medium-density fibreboard (MDF). In the wet method the bonding forces inherent in the wood itself are used by employing a thermomechanical process to resolve the wood into its fibres; the resulting fibrous pulp is then bonded together under the action of pressure and heat. Therefore, no additional chemical binder is required.

Medium density fibreboard (MDF)

MDF was first developed in the USA around 30 years ago. The dry method used for producing this type of board involves drying the fibres, spraying them with glue and subsequently pressing them together in a continuous process. Medium density fibreboards can be worked like solid timber. Three-dimensional profiling is possible with the thicker versions.

MDF is primarily used for furniture and fitting-out applications, also as a substrate for painting, veneer and coating work. Such boards are not stable at high moisture levels and should therefore not be used externally.

Bitumen-impregnated wood fibre insulating board

A bitumen emulsion can be added during manufacture in order to make the board water-repellent. These boards are suitable for use as external i nsulation behind a ventilated timber leaf or facade, and also as i mpact sound insulation beneath floor finishes.

Fig. 25: Medium density fibreboard (MDF)

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