East West Section

FIGURE 1.34 Byzantine Period. Plan and section of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople built by Justinian 532-537. Plan shows the reconstructed atrium. This church which represents a totally new architectural development was designed by the architects Anthemius of Tralles and Isidore of Miletus. (Courtesy Cyril M. Harris. (Ed.) Historic Architecture Sourcebook, McGraw-Hill)

FIGURE 1.34 Byzantine Period. Plan and section of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople built by Justinian 532-537. Plan shows the reconstructed atrium. This church which represents a totally new architectural development was designed by the architects Anthemius of Tralles and Isidore of Miletus. (Courtesy Cyril M. Harris. (Ed.) Historic Architecture Sourcebook, McGraw-Hill)

FIGURE 1.35 Romanesque Period. Cathedral of St. Pierre, Angoullme (France). Building commenced in 1110 and consecrated in 1128. The nave is roofed by three domes in a row.

Gothic Design (1150 to 1500)

Gothic building developed from the Romanesque style and is widely regarded as one of the finest achievements of the Middle Ages. The transition from the Romanesque to the Gothic took place towards the early part of the 12th century in France, and reached its zenith during the 13th century in France and England. The plan form was typically in the shape of a Latin Cross.The main body of the building formed the nave,flanked on both sides by low aisles.Some-times there were chapels dedicated to saints built off the aisles (Figure 1.36). The Gothic style is characterized by the use of the pointed arch (which was substituted for the semicircular arch), groin vault, buttress, tracery, and large windows, with a corresponding reduction in wall areas.

Cross Section Notre Dame

FIGURE 1.36 Gothic Period. Section through Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Paris. The cathedral was designed by Jean d'Orbais and started in 1211, with the main works completed in 1311. A prime example of French Gothic with its skillful use of flying buttresses. (From Cyril M. Harris, Ed., Historic Architecture Sourcebook, McGraw-Hill Co., New York, 1977)

FIGURE 1.36 Gothic Period. Section through Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Paris. The cathedral was designed by Jean d'Orbais and started in 1211, with the main works completed in 1311. A prime example of French Gothic with its skillful use of flying buttresses. (From Cyril M. Harris, Ed., Historic Architecture Sourcebook, McGraw-Hill Co., New York, 1977)

Pointed arched ceilings supported by ribs carried down to slender clustered column supports, and the structure was dominated by equalizing the thrust and counterthrust.The characteristic features of the Gothic style are an accentuation of the vertical line, a constancy towards height and lightness while minimizing the role of the wall, which became thinner and very delicate, being broken up into tall bays. Structural strength was increased through the use of buttresses, and subsequently of flying buttresses, which removed the load-bearing structures to a position outside the actual building, thereby allowing the use of large windows.The final developments produced exquisite forms of lacelike stonework with intersecting ribs and beautiful intertwining tracery (Figure 1.37). From France, Gothic architecture and design spread throughout Europe, producing some local variations.

Gothic art in all its forms was conventional and idealistic. Almost all the furniture and woodwork of this period was in natural-finished oak, although walnut was used on occasion. The designs were heavy in their proportions and rectangular in shape. The parts were assembled with wooden dowels, mortise-and-tenon joints and hand-cut dovetails. Furniture designs and ornamentation were borrowed from architectural forms and motifs (Figure 1.38).

How To Sell Furniture

How To Sell Furniture

Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

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