Info

151 sq. fl.

140 m1

US sq. ft.

30-7 m:

90 sq. ft.

8,4 m:

81 sq. fL

7.5 in*

{,9 sq. fL

6 4uf

Space per bimpioyci: -2002 275 sq.ft. 25.5 mr m sq.ft. 17.7 m''

115 nt it' 10.7mJ

ifSsq.EL 3.S ill"

FIGURE 2.8 Evolving space standards and square footage criteria.

FIGURE 2.9 Furniture should be capable of reconfiguration when required.

SOXF. FACTORS THAT lNFt UtittCfc THF s f >v ft\ f f 0 [■ Al. I ] ^ fiK > ».is r__

ArousliC futlûrS Sound lew] FrcquentEy I>iLTii!kin

SpecLrM compimly FliKlqiUinni in »uni ie^cl FlmcluajiLins in froquiMicy Utiicliiw of 1lie noise

Nûciïcotislii: Past cxpr nenn wil II ihn ni):St fecion Liîc-ciicr'.i attiviiy

J'neitn'iiihili I y of noiit ixeiiiitiiit

Noocuilyerihc noise bfliaitr'i personality

Aliitf.dei tow ard (he noise source Time o f year Time g T dijf T>jw oflncfllc

FIGURE 2.10 Noise factors that affect privacy and production levels. (From Mark S. Sanders and Ernest J. McCormick, Human Factors in Engineering and Design, McGraw Hill, New York, 1987)

by the project are now prepared, and preliminary space allocation plans showing partitions, furnishings, equipment, lighting, and other pertinent planning ideas, are developed (Figure 2.11). Most contemporary businesses in this age of rapidly advancing technology are designed to accommodate complex systems of computer networks and equipment necessary to run the business.

Space requirements for floor loading, cabling, HVAC, electrical and acoustical considerations, should be determined at this stage. The designer/space planner also prepares studies to establish the design concept of the project including types and qualities of materials, finishes, and furniture. This may include color and material sample boards and preliminary selection of furniture types as appropriate. A preliminary statement of probable project cost is also prepared based on the design concept, furnishings, fixtures and equipment, and on comparison with current costs for other projects of similar scope and quality. As with all budgets, the designer is not responsible for final project cost.

Special requirements for floor loading, cabling, HVAC, electrical and acoustical considerations should be determined. In addressing the needs of the modern workplace, the design should take into account, not only functionality, ergonomics, and the physical environment but also psychological and social considerations as well.

FIGURE 2.11 Developing preliminary space allocations. (From Mark Karlen, Space Planning Basics, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New Your, 1993)

Bubble and Blocking/Stacking Diagrams

The schematic space plan takes the bubble and blocking/stacking diagrams to the next level of detail and sophistication (Figures 2.12, 2.13). When the area assignment is complete, the space planner proceeds to develop a space layout that reflects the program's stated requirements and objectives. Functional elements are located within the space in a format consistent with the program's goals and objectives while retaining the desired adjacencies and functions. While the schematic space plan is being developed, the design team simultaneously works on preliminary design concepts for interior architectural elements, finishes and furniture. This is outlined in greater depth in Chapter Three. It should be noted that blocking/stack plans lack detailed information regarding the activities and space layout within the organization. This comes at a later stage in the development of the design. Upon completion of the schematic design, it should be presented to the client for review, modification and final approval (in writing), before proceeding to the next phase, of design development.

FIGURE 2.12 Bubble diagram for showing functional relationships and approximate space allocation.

FIGURE 2.13 a) Block plans locate support areas in close proximity to allow maximum flexibility for space planning the divisions. b) Stacking plans locate service areas on the ground level for access and structural capacity on grades. (From Julie K. Rayfield, The Office Interior Design Guide, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 1994)

FIGURE 2.13 a) Block plans locate support areas in close proximity to allow maximum flexibility for space planning the divisions. b) Stacking plans locate service areas on the ground level for access and structural capacity on grades. (From Julie K. Rayfield, The Office Interior Design Guide, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 1994)

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