Triple plug

Kakushi Tsugi Dimensions

This assembly connects three beams on three faces of a column. The two opposite beams arc spliced through the column. The first beam to be connected (beam 1, short male) is perpendicular to the other two beams. A dowel secures it to the column. The second part of the assemblage proceeds in the same fashion as for the preceding joint. The lower part of the tenons of beam 2 (male) and beam 3 (female) is shorter than on the double plug due to the presence of the extra beam. A very tight joint...

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Japanese Architectural Schematics

Top Angle brace, center from left to right rafters, rafter column, girders A and 8, hip rafter Bottom from left to right Covering boards, columns, hip rafter post Assembling the eave girders (the stepped tenon of the corner column extends beyond the girders to the top surface of the hip rafter The angle brace is set in place. Installing a short post to support the hip rafter (necessary for this system only The angle brace is set in place. Installing a short post to support the hip rafter...

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(3) Housed tenon and mortise splice (kakushi mechiire) Three faces of this splice reveal a clean straight line once assembled. It is a common method for splicing exposed posts. (4) Blind tenon and mortise splice (hako mechiire) This beautiful splice reveals only a clcan straight line on all faces once assembled. However, manufacturing of this joint is technically difficult.

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Groundsill Connectors

O Arrangement of the members O Beam 1 (short male) is assembled first. O Arrangement of the members O Beam 1 (short male) is assembled first. Beam 3 (female) slides over the projecting end of the tenon of beam 2 (male). After tightening the joint, two keys are inserted. After tightening the joint, two keys are inserted. A dovetail is carved on half of the depth of one member. A rectangular mortise runs through the depth of the second member immediately behind the mortise for the dovetail. A...

Wood Joints In Classical Japanese Architecture

Begins carpentry apprenticeship in 1924 Starts own enterprise in 1930 Serves in navy 1944-1946 Member of Tcnri Kyokai, involved in design and construction of temples Prepares wood shop drawings for Eishin Gakuen Higashino High School (1983-1985) Graduates in Architecture from Wascda University 1943 - Receives Doctor of Engineering I960 - Professor of Wascda University 1961 Director of the Japanese Photoelastic Association 1979 WOOD JOINTS IN CLASSICAL JAPANESE ARCHITECTURE Torashichi Sumiyoshi...

Introduction by Yukihiro Kamiyama

Japanese architecture brings to mind stupendous Buddhist temples and shrines, plus the three- and five-story pagodas. Amongst these sacred places, one cannot help being overwhelmed by the radiance emanating from the structures. The purity of the lines leaves us in awe. Master craftsmen, inspired by the beauty of the Japanese cyprcss and zelkova and influenced by the Japanese culture, produced these works of art. Behind the beauty lies the skill and knowledge of an artisan.The harmony of the...

Column splices

Basara Tsugi

Two goosenecks are carved diagonally across the section. The male and female slide over each other at 45* to assemble the splicc. The two goosenecks are small in relation to the size of the section. Skillful craftsmanship is required while manufacturing. This splicc is suitable for large columns. Hard wood, such as zclkova, is often used. The peculiarity of this splice is the identical gooseneck motif found on all faccs of the column. O The male slides into the female diago- 0 Same nally. _ _ O...

Tenon and mortise splices

(1) Cross-shaped tenon and mortise splice (juji mechiirc) This splice is effective against torsion but cannot resist any tensile forces. It is often combined with splicing plates bolted throughout. (2) Right angle tenon and mortise splice Two faces of this splice reveal a clcan (kancori mcchiire) straight line when assembled.

Stepped gooseneck splice

Square section lumber between 150mm and 200mm. For sections of more than 200mm oblique scarf spliccs are more appropriate. The gooscncck splice is also used on groundsills however, it has a higher strength than the dovetailed splice. In prac-ticc, it is used to join larger lumber sections than the preceding splice. The gooscncck with tenon and mortise serves to splice Tost sample dimensions. Angular dimensions are shown on the next page. Tost sample dimensions. Angular dimensions are shown on...

Blind wedging joint

This joint is commonly used on eave brackets, hanging posts of lintel and whenever the tenon and mortise are better left hidden. To assemble this joint, two wedges are loosely driven in the tenon. The tenon is then inserted in the mortise and driven in. The wedges hit the bottom of the mortise, opening the tenon like a fan and locking it permanently. Experience is important in manufacturing this joint. The tenon is always cut a little bit shorter than the depth of the mortise to insure the...

Mortised rabbeted oblique splice

The principal dilTcrcncc consists of having to shift away from each other the upper and lower woods to complete the splice. The tensile test produced results identical to splice 03. Both ends of the splice arc identical only the upper wood is displayed in the diagram. This joint is also assembled by sliding over each other the internal faces of the upper wood and lower wood, keeping the surfaces of the middle drops surfaces kd in close contact. To complete this splice, the upper wood is shifted...

Housed splices

Hako Kakushi Tsugi

These splices are often used on finishing materials. 1 Housed rabbeted oblique scarf splice kakushi kanawa Very similar to the rabbeted oblique scarf splice except that only half of the width of the section is rabbeted oblique. The other half is housed producing a clean straight line on two faces once assembled. This joint is useful when no significant strength is required. The length of the splice and inclination of the oblique surface line 1 and c arc arbitrary. The surfaces of the middle...

Stepped dovetailed splice

Japanese Joint Types Stepped Splice

This simple splicc is utilized primarily to join groundsills. The most common lumber sections range from 105mm to 120mm square. The ends to be spliced are notched at half depth. The male is shaped like the tail of a dove, narrow at the girth then llaring out. The female is precisely hollowed out to fit. A snug fit is a common characteristic of all joints. This joint is simply assembled by sliding the male into the female. No axial shifting is rcquircd.This feature makes this joint particularly...

Clam Shaped Splice

Introduction by Yukihiro Kamiyama Authors' Comments Acknowledgment SPLICING JOINTS 03 Rabbeted oblique scarf splice 8 04 Mortised rabbeted oblique splice 11 05 Blind stubbed, housed rabbeted oblique scarf splice 15 1 Cross-shaped tenon and mortise splice 2 Right angle tenon and mortise splice 3 Housed tenon and mortise splice 4 Blind tenon and mortise splice 07 Halved rabbeted oblique scarf splices 21 1 Triple-faced halved rabbeted oblique scarf splice with key 3 Quadruple-faced halved rabbeted...

Blind stubbed housed rabbeted oblique scarf splice

The shape and mechanical properties of this splice are practically identical to splice 04. Aesthetically speaking however, this splice is said to be of a superior design than other rabbeted oblique scarf splices an elevation view of the splice reveals only a clean straight line. For square sections between 1 05 to 1 20 mm the length of the splice should be 3 to 4 times the width of the section. 0 The surfaces of the middle drops surfaces d touch For square sections between 1 05 to 1 20 mm the...

Rabbeted oblique scarf splice

This splicc can be used to join groundsills, girders or beams. The two ends of the joints are identical and referred to as the upper wood and lower wood. Two mortises are deepened through the depth of the splicc for inserting draw pins. The joint is assembled by sliding the internal face of the upper wood over the internal face of the lower wood, keeping the surfaces of the middle drops surfaces d in close contact. The pieces are then pressed together and secured by pounding in two draw pins,...

Halved rabbeted oblique scarf splices

Images Scarf Joint Post

This decorative splicc is often used for finishing, particularly on exposed ceiling members it has very few structural applications. Double-faced halved rabbeted oblique scarf splices, as shown in figure a , when applied as decorative design, arc dimensioned so that the length of the in clined plane is twice the size of the cross section. For stronger structural use, as for baiter posts for example, the length of the inclined planes is made equal to the size of the cross section. The...

Orioku system

Japanese Housed Dovetail Joint

In this ease, the rafters' tie beams sit directly on top of the columns and the cavc girders run on top of the tie beams. The stepped tenon of the column is notched a few millimeters shorter than shown in the diagrams to avoid having the girder accidentally snagged by it. The Orioku system results in a lower ceiling height than the Kyoro. The Kyoro system is more flexible because rafters and tic beams do not have to be supported at the same location as the columns. From left to right rafter,...