The paved waterfront

The promenade along the waterfront is 11.15m wide x 570m long and is paved with granite setts. Two sets of railway lines remain in the pavement, connected by gently curving pieces of track. Two rows of granite slabs have been placed along one set of tracks. Along the harbour edge, groups of Crataegus crus-galli have been planted. The promenade is interrupted in places by new features with more elevation, such as the skateboard rink, new walls, the pergola and the tower in the playground. There...

About the designers

Annelise Bramsnss (1941-99) worked in Sven-Ingvar Anderson's landscape architecture office (1967-70), and as an Assistant and Associate Professor at the Royal Academy of Arts School of Architecture, Department of Town Planning and Landscape, Copenhagen (1973-99). She was a teacher, researcher and writer, mainly in the area of landscape planning, and her particular interest was in how nature and natural resources relate to spatial qualities and aesthetics in landscape architecture. Bramsnss took...

Landscape architecture in Denmark

Danish landscape architecture has been vigorous for over a hundred years.1 Its origins were in the design of private gardens, but since the start of the 1930s landscape designers have participated in a wide range of projects from parks and housing areas to motorways and landscape planning. After the Second World War, the amount and range of landscape architectural assignments rapidly expanded. Several landscape architects had careers which spanned 40-50 years and during this period a new...

Project history

With a population of 1.3 million people, Munich is the third largest city in Germany. The new area around the Munich Exhibition Centre is currently being developed as a new city quarter. The project has been evaluated as 'one of the most interesting projects of urban development in Europe'.4 Although property is expensive to buy or rent in Munich, the city is known as one of the most attractive places to live in Germany, because of its proximity to the Alps and to the lovely lake environments...

Landscape architecture in Hungary

In spite of Hungary's relatively small size, there are multiple and varied challenges for Hungarian landscape architects. The country has a mosaic landscape structure which spreads from sub-alpine mountains to sub-Mediterranean regions and to the plains which have a continental climate, but seem to be getting warmer and drier as a result of global warming. Furthermore, as a result of historical forces, there is a huge contrast in the economic situation and development of various regions. The...

Planting scheme

The five parts of the world with a Mediterranean climate - the Mediterranean Basin, west California, central Chile, the tip of South Africa and part of southern Australia - although so widely separated from one another, nevertheless present extraordinary climatic affinities, which are reflected in the appearance and structure of their plants, their systems of land use and also the general appearance of their landscapes. Plants in these various Mediterranean regions have had to adapt to survive...

Landscape architecture in Sweden

The dialogue and harmony between landscape architecture and the natural landscape are explicit and obvious in Sweden, whether it is shown by designers taking their inspiration from nature or by the incorporation of existing natural elements into a design. The garden or park often appears as nature refined. The clue, or key word, for landscape architecture in Sweden could be resistance. This word can be interpreted in terms of the resistance offered by the natural landscape and the harsh climate...

Landscape architecture in Spain

Park Landscape Architecture

It is difficult to summarise the landscape design tradition in Spain, although everyone might agree that a new approach or 'tradition' in public space design started in the democratic municipalities in the early 1980s. During four decades of grey Franco dictatorship, open public space had been completely neglected. With the advent of freedom, street events, such as concerts, markets and street parades, emerged instinctively. It became obvious that recovering public open space, as the ultimate...

Jens Balsby Nielsen Torben Dam and Ian Thompson

This is a book about landscape construction and the importance of good detailed design, but it is not a book of standard details, nor will it instruct you how to set about creating details of your own. It might, however, convince you that the consideration of detail is as important as an exciting concept or a striking site plan. It might show how a big idea can be worked through into every detail, and how details can come together in a powerfully convincing way. It might inspire you to think...

Landscape architecture in Ireland

The Irish Free State came into being in 1922, following a civil war, when 26 Irish counties seceded from the United Kingdom as the 'Irish Free State'. The conditions for this split developed during the previous century as a result of social, political, economic factors, cultural imperatives and the severe effects of the potato famine of the 1840s. Six counties remained within the UK as Northern Ireland. With the creation of a republic in 1949, the Republic of Ireland was born. The Republic of...

Landscape architecture in France

France has a long tradition of landscape architecture. The famous seventeenth-century parks created by Andr Le N tre form an important heritage, which is reflected in today's landscape architectural practice.1 Some contemporary projects are as large as the enormous parks of the seventeenth century, but landscape architects no longer design royal parks instead their work is found in industrial areas, residential quarters and even in motorway service stations. Since the 1970s, a stream of...

Landscape architecture in Germany

Landscape architecture in its current form is a relatively young discipline in Germany, despite the fact that when one looks at past garden art and garden architecture, its origins have very traditional roots. The planning and designs of landscape gardeners such as Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell (1750-1823) or Peter Joseph Lenn (1789-1866) still influence the appearance and the open space systems of important German cities today. If we confine our observations to contemporary landscape...