The Appearance Of Covering

The progressive substitution of thin, lightweight, and transparent elements of enclosure for thick, heavy, and opaque walls would seem to have completed itself in our time, were it not for the fact that many of the opportunities for figuration in architecture especially those associated with thick-wall construction remain unexplored within the context of modern building. The victory of thin over thick would be a hollow one indeed if it marked the end of the building's role in mediating private...

Info

Josef Hoffmann, Palais Stoclet, facade, Brussels, 1911. conceal the connection, giving the facade the appearance of upholstery articulated with sewn piping.3 In upholstery and in dressmaking, piping a cord enclosed in a pipelike fold serves as the trimming or ornamentation of edges or seams. A similar joining technique may be found in confectionery, where the cordlike lines are made of sugar. In neither case is the support of a surface, or load bearing, indicated such bands run both...

Postscript

Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason (Riga, 1781), B 860-861 cited and translated in Caroline van Eck, Organicism in Nineteenth-Century Architecture (Amsterdam, 1994), 122. 3. The basic texts include Martin Heidegger, The Question Concerning Technology, in The Question Concerning Technology and Other Essays (New York, 1977), 3-35 Herbert Marcuse, From Negative to Positive Thinking Technological Rationality and the Logic of Domination, in One Dimensional Man (Boston, 1964), 144-169 J rgen...

Atectonic fabrications suding surfaces

The fabric analogy for architectural cladding had wide currency in Austrian and German architecture in the early years of the twentieth century. While Otto Wagner, Josef Hoffmann, and Max Fabiani drew on the teachings of Gottfried Semper for this analogy, each interpreted it differently. The complexity of the topic is revealed in these differences.1 In Hoffmann's Palais Stoclet (1911), for example, the application of moldings around the edges of the stone cladding reinforces the planar quality...

Technique And Appearance The Task Of The Present

In 1960 Reyner Banham ended his Theory and Design in the First Machine Age with the following observation It may well be that what we have hitherto understood as architecture, and what we are beginning to understand of technology, are incompatible disciplines. The architect who proposes to run with technology knows now that he will be in fast company, and that, in order to keep up, he may have to emulate the Futurists and discard his whole cultural load, including the professional garments by...

Adjusting Standards

H. van der Leeuw on his trip to America, c. 1925, quoted in Leen van der Vlugt, Weiderhall 14 (Amsterdam, 1993), 9. 2. Van Nelle Tobacco Factory, Rotterdam, Holland, Architectural Record (1929), 387 390. 3. See H. A. J. Henket and W. de Jong, Bouwtechnisch Onderzoek Jongere Bouwkunst (Eindhoven, 1987), vol. 2, 35. 4. William Jordy has observed that the PSFS building is the most important tall building built between the time of the Chicago School and the...

Notes

1 iNTroducTioN why surface arcniTEcTurE 1. Albert Kahn, Architectural Trend, Journal of the Maryland Academy of Sciences 2, no. 2 (April 1931), 124 125 cited in Terry Smith, Making the Modern Industry, Art, and Design in America (Chicago, 1993), 81-83. 2. Alan Colquhoun, The Concept of Regionalism, in G. B. Nalbantoglu and C. T. Wong, eds., Postcolonial Space(s) (New York, 1997), 17. 3. Kenneth Frampton, Towards a Critical Regionalism Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance, in Hal Foster,...

P5

Antonio Comini, Palazzo Bonacossa, Milan, 1894. Photo Charles H. Tashima, 1991. a mountain range (Gebirg) and of feelings in one's disposition (Gem t). The prefix ge- is important because it signifies gathering together. The collection and integration of elements on a bookshelf or in a skeleton are both signified by the word Ge-stell.4 But it is not the unity of parts in such an ensemble that makes Heidegger's sense of enframing unusual and difficult, nor is this what makes the Gestell...