Argeton system

Another family of cladding using terracotta originated from Germany, where it was developed by the architect Thomas Herzog and known as the Argeton system.

In the early 1980s, Professor Herzog became interested in the concept of a curtained ceramic facade and developed it into a system. In order to bring this system to market maturity, Argeton, a consortium of German roof tile production plants, was founded. From 1981 until market introduction in I 986, Professor Herzog was the sole development partner of the Moding GmbH & Co KG roof tile production plant. As a result of close collaboration, in 1984 the Moding roof tile plant produced its first facade tile, which was used on a building in Munich Lohhof.

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During the 1990s the system was developed with special clip holders and introduced as the Moding Argeton tile facade. The appearance of the product somewhat resembles the Rue de Meaux project by Piano. Herzog's design is simpler and was not developed specifically for one project but for more general use.The system was first imported into the UK by SJW (now ceased trading) and marketed by James & Taylor, who later went on to sell the system as Moding Alphaton.The name 'Argeton'was retained in UK by the Telling, Architectural Group. An early use of the system was at the De Montfort University's library extension in Leicester (architect Eva Jiricna) using standard format tiles, size 400 mm x 200 mm x 30

The Argeton System was also used by Brookes Stacey Randall Architects at Churchill Centre in Rotterdam.

2.4 Argeton terracotta at Churchill Centre Rotterdam (architects: Brookes Stacey Randall). Photo: Christian Richters and Nik Randall.
2.5 Churchill Centre Rotterdam (architects: Brookes Stacey Randall). Photo: Christian Richters and Nik Randall.

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