Sheeting rails and liner trays

The optimum use of sheeting rails to support profiled cladding is critical to the economic use of the material and its capacity to withstand wind loading. Constrado (1980) shows typical spans of around 2 m for profiled steel cladding, depending upon its profile.Thus sheeting rails are required at intervals up the height of the wall to support the cladding. These sheeting rails must themselves be designed to span between the main support columns (Fig. 5.32).

As an alternative to sheeting rails, liner trays can be used, which when clipped together (Fig. 5.33) act as horizontal rails at 500 mm intervals.The interaction of cladding and liner trays provides a composite lattice effect. Mineral fibre insulation can be pushed into the

5.32 Sheeting rails are needed to span between main supports.

5.33 Liner tray assembly.

liner trays from the outside before the outer profile cladding is fixed.The flat surface of the liner tray, which can be prepainted, then acts as a finished inner lining to the construction. The liner can either be used horizontally as described above, or vertically, used in conjunction with horizontal profiled cladding.

References and further reading

Brookes A. J. (1980) Claddings I - Product selection and specifiaction of profiled asbestos cement, steel and aluminium sheets. Architects'Journal, 172 (41), 705-719.

BSI (1976) BS 5427:1976, Code of practice for performance and loading criteria for profiled sheeting in building, British Standards Institution, London.

CEGB (1970) Design memorandum - wall and roof cladding, 097/1 17 issue, 12 April, Central Electricity Generating Board, London.

Christ, C. (1981) Outdoor durability and performance of prepainted, cold rolled galvanized and aluminized steels, in Proceedings of International Conference on the Durability of Building Materials and Components, 14-16 September National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, USA, pp. 3 13-326.

Constrado (1980) Propled Steel Cladding and Decking for Commercial and Industrial Buildings, Doc SMP/38/80, Constrado, London.

Falconer R (1981) Industrial pitched roofs - the art of construction series. Architects'Journal, 174 (41), 759-773.

Herzog, Krippner and Lang (2004) Fassenden Atlas, Birkhauser Basel, 101-123.

MacGregor I. (198 I) Coil coating. Build, No. 29, October Building Research Association of New Zealand.

Metal Roof Deck Association (1970) Code of Design and Technical Requirements for 'Light' Gauge Metal Roof Decks, Metal Roof Deck Association, Sussex.

Thomas, D. A. (1981) Initial degradation of corrosion protection by organic coatings, in Proceedings of International Conference on the Durability of Building Materials and Components, 14-16 September National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, USA, pp. 297-303.

Sheet metal, composite metal panels and rain screens

The idea is to create a flexible framework, a framework which embraces the floor; the walls and the ceiling so that within that framework the plan is completely changeable.

Norman Foster (1978)

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