Project description

Source: Schoeberl and Poell OEG, Vienna, www.schoeberlpoell.at

Figure 6.1.1 The Vienna Utendorfgasse Passivhaus Apartment Building

6.1.1 Portrait and context

During the planning and construction of the Utendorfgasse Passivhaus apartment building in Vienna, many fundamental questions regarding the planning of social housing according to the Passivhaus standard were addressed. The challenge was to meet this standard while keeping costs within the limited budget allowed for social housing. Schöberl und Pöll OEG succeeded in completing the first such project to this very high standard.

Key aspects of the project are as follows:

• high cost efficiency: extra costs for the Passivhaus standard; ^€75/m2 effective living area;

• low energy consumption - Passivhaus standard: space heating energy demand ^ 15 kWh/m2a; heat load ^ 10 W/m2; air tightness n50 ^ 0.6 ach; primary energy demand ^ 120 kWh/m2a; and

• high comfort standards: controlled ventilation, acoustics, hygiene and user acceptance.

6.1.2 Architectural concept

The building site, Utendorfgasse 7 in Vienna, is 2600 m2. An existing building is on the west side. Two of the three new buildings are attached to the existing fire walls of this neighbouring building. Each building, approximately 19 m long and 15 m deep, has a ground floor, three upper floors and an attic. The floors are reached via stair towers on the north side of each housing block. The footprint of the buildings is approximately 850 m2, providing a living area of approximately 3000 m2. Each living unit is approximately 75 m2 in extent. All dwellings have south-facing windows, loggias, balconies or terraces. The 39 obligatory parking spaces are in an underground garage.

HEIMAT ÖSTERREICH

Source: Franz Kuzmich, Vienna

Figure 6.1.2 Sketch of the section (left) and standard floor (right) of one of the three buildings

HEIMAT ÖSTERREICH

Source: Franz Kuzmich, Vienna

Figure 6.1.2 Sketch of the section (left) and standard floor (right) of one of the three buildings

6.1.3 Construction

The thermal uncoupling of the bearing walls from the foundation was solved with a special thermal break consisting of a band of aerated concrete. This is then faced with brick masonry. The conventional solution of using a high bearing strength insulation, such as 'Purenit' was too expensive.

Source: Werkraum ZT OEG, Vienna, www.werkraumwien.at Figure 6.1.3 Static system of the thermal decoupling

Solar Power Sensation V2

Solar Power Sensation V2

This is a product all about solar power. Within this product you will get 24 videos, 5 guides, reviews and much more. This product is great for affiliate marketers who is trying to market products all about alternative energy.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment