Domestic lifts

• Chair lifts. These can be provided to straight flights and can also be designed to turn right-angles so that the passenger can get off onto a flat surface rather than the top step.

Figure 11.8a Travelator foyer, Gatwick Airport, 1980, Architects: YRM

Figure 11.8b Manchester Airport's new 240m travelator (courtesy of Paul Miller)

Figure 11.8e Travelators within the British Pavilion, Seville, 1992, Architect: Nicholas Grimshaw and Partners

Figure 11.8c Satellite globe, Charles de Gaulle Airport, 1970 (courtesy of the Architectural Association)

Figure 11.8e Travelators within the British Pavilion, Seville, 1992, Architect: Nicholas Grimshaw and Partners

Figure 11.8d Trolley on travelator at Sainsbury's Camden Town, 1989, Architect: Nicholas Grimshaw and Partners

Figure 11.9b Stannah Stair chair lift

Figure 11.9a Hoist at the Louvre

Figure 11.9c Stair lift for wheelchair

• Hoists. Home hoists to take a wheelchair from ground to first floor are now possible. A hole is made in the first floor, guides are bolted to an external wall and a small open cabinet, approximately 1 200 mm high with platform, takes the passenger up or down. It is driven electrically (Figure 11.9 d). The guides are unobstrusive and when the platform is in its raised position the underside is flush with the ceiling, so that even when situated in a living room it is acceptable.

Figure 11.9b Stannah Stair chair lift

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