Hotel core details

Lift and stair locations in hotels depend upon permitted lengths of protected corri dors serving bedroom accommodation2 and have to relate to the building's footprint at entry level. This is not necessarily related to the street but to the upper part of the podium, as many hotels rise above one or more floors of commercial shopping. The Renaissance Center, Detroit (Figure 3.10«), is a good primer. Here, escalators, lifts and escape stairs serve the podium with a transfer to the main core within the entry to the hotel, to afford greater security.

Many Portman-designed hotels3 dramatize the entry zone with a vast atrium surrounded by galleries served by wall-climber lifts top to bottom of the space (Figures 3.10« and 3.10b). A modest variation is the Hilton Hotel, London Airport, where the lifts form a vertical feature within a generous atrium. The bedroom wings are entered by open galleried bridges on either side of the lift shaft, whilst the fire stairs are lost within the bedroom wings to accord with British Regulations (Figures 3.11« and 3.11 b).

The final examples demonstrate the key roles of staircases in older buildings. Firstly, there is the Ritz Hotel, London, designed by Mewès and Davis in the early 1900s. The 'U' shaped plan placed the main façade to Piccadilly with return wings to Green Park. The sequence of public spaces runs east to west, with a large open-well stair placed as an eye-catcher turned towards the principal suites at first floor (Figure 3.12). Lift lobbies and secondary stairs occur off the main axis but are subservient to the grand stairs first glimpsed off the main entry.

By contrast, the Lanesborough Hotel is a conversion from the former St George's Hospital of 1827. The new internal circulation has been resited to emphasize lifts and vestibules while the former stairhall now

Varying profile of atrium

Metric scale

Figure 3.7a No. 1 Finsbury Avenue: Deep plan zones around atria spaces. The dimensions permit roughly consistent depth of office from fenestration

Varying profile of atrium

Metric scale

Figure 3-7c No. 1 Finsbury Avenue, City of London, 1985, Architects: Arup Associates: Fagade with stair nodes expressed as towers

Figure 3.7a No. 1 Finsbury Avenue: Deep plan zones around atria spaces. The dimensions permit roughly consistent depth of office from fenestration

Figure 3-7c No. 1 Finsbury Avenue, City of London, 1985, Architects: Arup Associates: Fagade with stair nodes expressed as towers

Figure 3 8b Bracken House: Atria and lift cores at upper level
Figure 3-8c Bracken House: Steel plate towers to support wall-climber lifts (courtesy Alan Delaney, Wordsearch)

has a minor function and relates simply to the basement dining area. The scale of the remodelled hallway is a reminder of the grandeur of stairs before lifts took over in hotel planning (Figure 3.13).

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