Uses Of Glassfibre Reinforced Plastics

The lightweight properties of GRP make it eminently suitable for the manufacture of large cladding panels and custom-moulded structures as illustrated in the belfry and spire of St James, Piccadilly, London

Fig. 11.2 GRP replacement spire - Church of St James, London. Photograph: Courtesy of Smith of Derby Ltd

(Fig. 11.2). Finishes may be self-coloured or incorporate a natural stone aggregate finish. In addition, GRP is frequently used for the production of architectural features such as barge boards, dormer windows, classical columns and entrance canopies (Fig. 11.3). GRP may be pigmented to simulate various timbers, slate, Portland or Cotswold stone and lead or copper. It

Fig. 11.2 GRP replacement spire - Church of St James, London. Photograph: Courtesy of Smith of Derby Ltd

Fig. 11.3 Typical GRP components

is also used to produce a wide range of small building components including baths, valley troughs, flat roof edge trim and water drainage systems. In addition, a wide range of composite cladding panels are manufactured from glass-fibre reinforced resins incorporating stone granules within the core of the material. These products, which are impact and fire-resistant, are available with either a granular stone, painted or gel-coat finish.

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