Nonproprietary Stakeholders

Natural heritage conservationists Cultural heritage preservationists 'Third party' stakeholders Political advocates Bureaucratic organizations Professional practice stakeholders ronment at large, is the way governments stream their administrative conscience into an enabling-now rather than an outcome-later public policy format. The developmental thrust of successive governments in the New World has centred around exploitation of the natural resource capital, and an obsession with fiscal...

Future

The system of recording landownership in the manner of a stockholding facilitated the bartering of land. If boundaries were to be guaranteed (and thereby surveyed) it was found expedient and cheaper to assign large rectilinear (often 'quarter-square' blocks in North America, 1,000-acre blocks in New Zealand, larger for inland Australia) with seldom an allowance for, or fitting in with, the varied land form and its salient topographical features. No effort was made in the Anglo...

Sustainable and Ethical

Chapters 1 and 2 lay foundations express definitions, establish theory, explore philosophical understandings. These are precursors to the practical guidelines given in later chapters the 'Charter' (chapter 3), 'Growth Pattern Management' (chapter 4), and 'Urban Growth Management' (chapter 5). The reader versed in planning theory principles and philosophy, or bent on getting to grips with planning practice, can make direct access to the Practice section. What impresses the newcomer to the Anglo...